Ali Lmrabet ends hunger strike – Campaign for his release continues

first_imgNews Hunger strike is last resort for some imprisoned Moroccan journalists RSF_en June 24, 2003 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Ali Lmrabet ends hunger strike – Campaign for his release continues Follow the news on Morocco / Western Sahara Morocco / Western SaharaMiddle East – North Africa Receive email alerts Reporters Without Borders today welcomed jailed newspaper editor Ali Lmrabet’s decision to call off his hunger strike after 50 days. The decision was announced yesterday by Prince Moulay Hicham, King Mohammed’s cousin, at a news conference in Casablanca in which the participants included Lmrabet’s lawyers and sisters and Reporters Without Borders secretary-general Robert Ménard.Lmrabet has lost 22 kg since beginning his hunger strike on 6 May, and he is very weak. Ménard called for him to be given all necessary medical tests to ensure that he does not suffer serious aftereffects, and for him to be allowed to receive a visit from his personal physician, Jamila Rhandy, who has not been able to see him for the past week.Reporters Without Borders said Lmrabet’s decision to end his hunger strike was a relief to all his friends and colleagues but was not a victory. Certain sources close to the government had said King Mohammed might issue a royal pardon, but this had not yet happened. Lmrabet was still in prison, he still had to serve a three-year jail sentence for his opinions and his two satirical weeklies were still banned, so the international campaign had to go on, the organisation said.Reporters Without Borders confirmed that it would continue its own efforts to obtain Lmrabet’s release. This will include a campaign to alert tourists travelling to Morocco to the other side of a country that is subject to royal caprice and press freedom violations.”Keeping Lmrabet in prisons signals a step back for freedom of expression in Morocco and an increase in authoritarianism by the monarchy,” Ménard said. “No one in the Kingdom of Morocco or abroad should resign themselves to this violation of freedoms.”Lmrabet is Reporters Without Borders’ correspondent in Morocco as well as being the owner and editor of the French-language Demain Magazine and its Arabic-language version Douman. He has been in prison since 21 May when a court in Rabat convicted him of “insulting the person of the king”, “offence against territorial integrity” and “offence against the monarchy.” The court sentenced him to four years in prison, banned his two publications and fined him 20,000 dirhams (about 2,000 euros). He was rushed from prison to Avicenne hospital in Rabat on 26 May, four days after being jailed.An appeal court on 17 June upheld the conviction while reducing the prison term to three years. Lmrabet’s lawyers have appealed against this decision to the court of cassation. June 8, 2021 Find out more News to go further April 15, 2021 Find out more News RSF joins Middle East and North Africa coalition to combat digital surveillance Morocco / Western SaharaMiddle East – North Africa Help by sharing this information NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs say News April 28, 2021 Find out more Organisation Reporters Without Borders welcomed jailed newspaper editor Ali Lmrabet’s decision to call off his hunger strike. Lmrabet has lost 22 kg since beginning his hunger strike on 6 May, and he is very weak. The organisation which called for him to be given all necessary medical tests confirmed that it would continue its own efforts to obtain Lmrabet’s release. last_img read more

Student Debt Up, Homeownership Down

first_img Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Tagged with: Student Debt Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, Market Studies, News Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Student Debt 2017-08-18 Brianna Gilpin It can seem overwhelming when realizing that getting a degree to make more money in the workforce can lead to student debt that you’re using your money on to pay off. It’s a vicious cycle. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau recently released data that shows nearly half of school borrowers are bogged down with at least $20,000 of student debt—double what it was 10 years ago.Their research also found that more borrowers are taking out student loans later on in life with fewer individuals paying the loan down in five years. The record breaking student debt and the stress that comes along with it are spurring more employers to offer student loan repayment benefits to their employees—something that might also help with homeownership rates.The Fed released a study in July discussing the connection between student debt and homeownership. When debt loads increase and individuals paychecks aren’t big enough to cover it, home buying tends to go on the back-burner. The Fed reported that as much as 35 percent of the decline in young American homeownership from 2007 to 2015 is due to the higher student debt loads.To get a view of what might have been, the paper suggests that if tuition had stayed at 2001 levels, 360,000 additional American’s would have owned homes in 2015. That means about 2.9 million more 28- to 30-year-old homeowners. According to the CFPB, half of student borrowers are older than 34 when they begin to pay off their loans.“Since 2003, the percentage of borrowers starting repayment over the age of 34 has doubled, increasing from 25 percent to nearly 50 percent,” the report noted. “The study also found the percentage of consumers beginning repayment under the age of 25 has decreased from 30 percent to 15 percent.”The good news is companies are beginning to recognize that student debt can push its way into the rest of consumers’ financial lives, including getting a home.“Borrowers may save hundreds or thousands of dollars in interest payments over the life of a loan when employers prepay student debt,” it said. “For example, with a 10-year, $30,000 loan at 6 percent interest, an employer paying $100 a month will save the borrower more than $11,000 over the life of the loan.” August 18, 2017 1,441 Views Home / Daily Dose / Student Debt Up, Homeownership Down Previous: Economy in a Nutshell Next: Week Ahead: Ten-X EVP Talks Housing Bubble The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago  Print This Post Share Save Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days agocenter_img Brianna Gilpin, Online Editor for MReport and DS News, is a graduate of Texas A&M University where she received her B.A. in Telecommunication Media Studies. Gilpin previously worked at Hearst Media, one of the nation’s leading diversified media and information services companies. To contact Gilpin, email [email protected] Student Debt Up, Homeownership Down About Author: Brianna Gilpin Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Related Articles Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Subscribe Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days agolast_img read more