Beyond Binary | Interview

first_imgNandini Krishnan, in her second book, Invisible Men, writes about females who identify as males, referred to as transmasculine people. A community so marginalised that people often don’t know they exist. She spoke with Prachi Sibal about their stories and the storm that the book has been embroiled in. Q:,Nandini Krishnan, in her second book, Invisible Men, writes about females who identify as males, referred to as transmasculine people. A community so marginalised that people often don’t know they exist. She spoke with Prachi Sibal about their stories and the storm that the book has been embroiled in.Q: What was your objective when writing a book on transmen?One was sharing of knowledge. Most people don’t even know transmen exist and the media has ensured that there are misconceptions about transpeople with mostly sensationalised and superficial coverage. The other objective was to repay my subjects for the hours spent they spent with me. The proceeds from the book’s sales will go to them. Many transmen are forced to run away from home, and often work in the exploitative, unorganised labour sector. Invisible Men Inside India’s Transmasculine Networks by Nandini Krishnan; Penguin Rs 699; 320 pagesQ: How have your views on gender and masculinity evolved?I used to think of sex as tertiary-male, female, intersex-and gender as a spectrum, but largely leaning towards either male or female. While working on the book, I met non-binary people who have changed the names they were assigned at birth, from a traditionally female name to a traditionally male name or vice versa, but did not identify with either gender. I met transmen who are attracted to men, and transmen who are pansexual.Q: What would you suggest to make the country a more inclusive place for transmasculine people?My only suggestion would be to listen. The government should listen to them, before passing callous bills like The Transgender Persons (Protection of Rights) Bill, 2018. Medical professionals, courts, human resource personnel and us, sitting comfortably and tweeting with hashtags, should listen to them. As should the governing bodies for gendered fields such as sports and the armed forces. That is the only way to make the country more inclusive.advertisementQ: Were you prepared for criticism from within the community?No, one is never prepared for something on this scale. And it was something new every day, which made me think the main problem was the fact that a ciswoman had written it. One day it was the foreword, another day it was ‘casteism’, then it was a ‘Hindutva agenda’, then ‘colonialism’ and ‘violent nationalistic fantasy’. Next thing I know, I’m being tagged in pictures of the book being burnt on the streets.last_img read more

School Board Members Attend Training Sessions

first_img Over 900 board members representing 489 public educational institutions participated in training sessions conducted by the National Council on Education (NCE). Executive Director of the NCE, Merris Murray, told JIS News that the training sessions, which were held during the period January to March, are legal requirements under the Education Act and Regulations and the NCE Act of 1993. Over 900 board members representing 489 public educational institutions participated in training sessions conducted by the National Council on Education (NCE).The NCE is a statutory body under the Ministry of Education, Youth and Information (MOEYI) responsible for the training of school board members, in collaboration with the National College for Educational Leadership (NCEL).Executive Director of the NCE, Merris Murray, told JIS News that the training sessions, which were held during the period January to March, are legal requirements under the Education Act and Regulations and the NCE Act of 1993.“The school board members occupy the highest level of authority within schools, and are responsible for the governance machinery,” she noted, adding that it is critical that these persons are aware of what the thrust of the Ministry is and what their responsibilities are in ensuring that schools are effectively governed.The participants were exposed to various aspects of school management and governance, which include Legal and Regulatory Framework Governing School Operations; Administrative/Human Resources Management; Fiduciary Responsibilities with special emphasis on Financial Management; Promoting Positive School Ethos, and Conflict Management and Resolution.Ms. Murray explained that the purpose of the workshops was to increase board members’ knowledge and understanding of educational issues and governance procedures, as well as to equip them with the necessary skills and expertise in order that they may carry out their work more effectively.“We hope that the information shared will not only deepen school board members’ understanding of their role and responsibilities, but that it will also impact student outcomes in a positive way,” she said.According to Ms Murray, the training was well received, and some of the participants indicated that they are now better equipped to go back to their schools to impact the education process.“Some felt that the information shared in terms of promoting positive ethos was very critical, because it is important that they know what their roles and functions are, so that they can carry them out in keeping with the law, and impact student outcomes positively,” she said.Research has shown that where schools are effectively managed and governed, they are better able to meet the needs of students in a holistic way. School boards are made up of representatives from student councils, academia, administrative and clerical staff, principals, church and Trust schools as well as council nominees.The training covered the Ministry’s Regions Three, Four, Five and Six. Come September 2018, school Board members in Regions One and Two will begin training. “The school board members occupy the highest level of authority within schools, and are responsible for the governance machinery,” she noted, adding that it is critical that these persons are aware of what the thrust of the Ministry is and what their responsibilities are in ensuring that schools are effectively governed. Story Highlightslast_img read more

Lindros urges MPs to recommend national protocol for sportsrelated concussions

first_imgOTTAWA — Former hockey great Eric Lindros brought his star power to Parliament Hill on Wednesday, urging MPs to develop a single national protocol for preventing and treating sports-related concussions.Among other things, Lindros suggested youngsters, whose brains are still developing, should have to take at least a few months off each year from rough-and-tumble sports to give their shaken brains a chance to heal.They should also be prevented from making hits on opponents until they’re in their mid-teens, Lindros said, and any player who delivers a hit to the head should face a severe penalty.Lindros, whose own NHL career was cut short after he suffered repeated debilitating concussions, was testifying at a special House of Commons committee that is exploring what, if anything, the federal government should be doing about sports-related head injuries.However, the 45-year-old steered clear of commenting on the NHL or other professional sports. Indeed, he warned MPs they’d be wasting their time trying to persuade pro leagues to improve their protocols for concussion prevention and treatment.“Quite honestly, any time you mix athletics and money, the lines blur,” Lindros told the committee. “I don’t think you focus there. That’s the top end.”Rather, Lindros said the focus should be on peewee and junior sports, where kids can be taught a different culture about concussions that will eventually trickle up to the pros.On his way into the committee, Lindros said there are “a lot of good efforts” happening in different sports across the country to develop concussion protocols, but they vary from sport to sport and region to region.“In my opinion, I’d like to see them consolidated,” he said.“Whether you’re riding horses or playing soccer or hockey … a concussion is a concussion.”When he was a kid, Lindros said he used to take a break from playing hockey from May to September each year. But with kids now increasingly playing contact sports 12 months a year, Lindros likened their brains to a pick-up truck being driven repeatedly over bumpy roads.“(If) you don’t every once in a while pull it in for servicing, something’s going to fall apart. Sooner or later, it’s inevitable.”The committee also heard from former professional wrestler and college football player Chris Nowinski, founder and CEO of the Concussion Legacy Foundation.Nowinski said in the past, athletes were essentially shamed into continuing to play after suffering a concussion. Over the past dozen years, he said, there’s been some progress in persuading young athletes that they “don’t need to be a hero.”The danger comes not just from outright concussions, but from receiving repeated hits to the head over time, which can lead to memory loss, cognitive decline, behavioural changes and mood disorders in later life, Nowinski said. And the earlier an athlete is exposed to head hits, the worse off he or she is likely to be in later life.Noting that government sets age limits for other dangerous activities, such as driving, drinking alcohol or smoking, Nowinski said: “Maybe we should regulate how often you’re allowed to let your child get hit in the head or how many concussions you’re allowed to have.” The Canadian Presslast_img read more

MEET ALEX KOTSYK

first_imgWho inspired you to follow your dream to pursue acting?I am a huge Broadway fan and it all started from random visit of Broadway production Fiddler on the Roof in NYC with my Ukrainian friends. When I saw that and just realized there is nothing else I want to do but work my butt off to be like them. And I mean, just imagine how much work being put by every member of the team, not just in theater but film, tv, actors and crew spend countless hours learn practice and then sometimes even volunteer for experience. I have so much respect for industry people. So when I see a high quality production, it’s like a bell for me that says: “Alex, are you still doing your best and you like them, are you putting all your efforts?” so yeah this keeps me inspired and creative.What challenges have you faced in the entertainment industry? What has been your most rewarding experience?Haha where do I start. So when I came to Canada my English wasn’t very good. And I would come to the audition and would hear: “Slate please” – I had no idea what they want, literally for the guy from Ukraine with English as his third language I had no idea what they were asking me, until like third or fourth audition when someone explained me it means to introduce yourself. I think some people just laughed at me that time but likely I stayed on my path and here I am talking to you as an award-winning actor. I had some really great experiences working with amazing individuals. I guess my most notable experience was studying with Larry Moss. I think I will remember it all my life. What a man he is, just wow. Dedication, ability to see you, empathy there is so many words. And I guess the other one was winning an award for best male performance at the film festival in Los Angeles. I star and helped produce short film called “Forever a Gentleman” and I would never expect what will come out of it but I guess if you do your best good things might come your way.What is your favourite type of character to play?That’s always a tough one. Either some historic figure (this one time I played Benito Mussolini in Dictator’s Playbook directed by Mark Stevenson) or someone like Joker, I have fun playing bad guys.What market do you currently work in? Are there other areas you would like to work?I work in Toronto as of the moment but of course always to open anywhere really. I want to do more theater. Just yesterday I was auditioning for a play so fingers crossed!What advice would you give to someone new trying to make it in the acting industry?Hm…do I have to pick just one? Ok i got it. Do your best – always – just do your best! Do look at other people, circumstances etc. Come in give it all, leave. And you never know what will come back to you. Also take classes, learn as much as you can! I can recommend some great places like LB Acting Studio or if you are a foreigner and what to work on accents, Rae Ellen Bodie is amazing! And if you want to stay ready, check out The Actors Place that has drop-ins for $10 which can be really good if you are on a budget. It was started as actors gym by this multifaceted actor and host Ivan Wanis Ruiz; and it’s a great community to meet actors and work on your skills! Advertisement Login/Register With: LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Alexander Kotsyk is a Toronto based award winning Canadian-Ukrainian actor and producer. From early days Alex gravitated towards being on stage, performing and hosting. He started his acting Regina, SK where he was getting his Master’s Degree in Public Policy. After graduating Alex went to Toronto and studied Meisner technique while working on some award winning indie projects. He continued learning the craft in different studio and coaches in Toronto.We had a chance to catch up to discuss his career.As a child, did you want to be an actor, or did it fall into place through other activities?I never wanted to be an actor, it just happened…I mean its sounds like something unreal but I am a guy from a small town in Ukraine called Chernivtsi, something like Regina, SK. Acting wasn’t something that was widely offered and I can’t even recall classes that you could go to and study. I guess it was always inside waiting for the moment and not until I came to Canada seven years ago I had an opportunity to engage with my creative side. You know Canada and Ukraine its a bit different because where I am from, we first think about money and security because you can’t predict whats going to happen tomorrow and after all the hustle there is not much energy left to be creative. While in Canada, I feel like we are more secure in our future and government can back us up. I mean, I might be wrong about this but that’s the image I have. Facebook Written By:  Darlene MorrisonIf you are an aspiring talent and would like to be featured in our Aspiring Talent SeriesContact Darlene via email at [email protected] to all (e.g. Actors, Models, Singers, Dancers, Producers, Directors, etc.) Advertisement Advertisement What fuels your passion? Ability to tell stories and be a part of helping people see and relate to things they haven’t before. This one time I was working on Chinese TV series for NTDtv and it was a fictional story about how Chinese government destroy people’s lives if they don’t agree with their policies. It was a fiction but then somewhere in the middle, I was like wow that’s actually happening right now in China and just to be a part of this was a great honor for me. I think people should have same rights regardless of where they are born, gender and how much wealth their parents have.What is something about you that most people would never guess?haha oh this is going to come back to me…I don’t know how to ride a bike.If you were to do it all over again, would you do things exactly the same? Do you have any regrets? Successes that make you proud? Absolutely not! With this experience and knowledge I would definitely do things differently and more efficiently. Just as a guy from Ukraine I didn’t know what to do and where to go if you want to be actor. It took me a lot of time to figure out road maps. I don’t have any regrets, I don’t believe in them. I think what happened is done and all you can do is get the best out of it and make sure you learn from it. Also don’t forget to have some fun during as it is life and I’ve heard we only have one!To follow Alex, check out his social media links below:IMDB: https://www.imdb.com/name/nm6180065/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/alexkotsyk/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/kotsyk Twitterlast_img read more