Iranian Navy Saves Hadis Cargo Ship from Pirates

first_img View post tag: Hadis Back to overview,Home naval-today Iranian Navy Saves Hadis Cargo Ship from Pirates August 2, 2011 View post tag: Navy Iranian Navy Saves Hadis Cargo Ship from Pirates View post tag: ship View post tag: Pirates View post tag: Iraniancenter_img The Islamic Republic of Iran’s Navy warship fleet has thwarted four attempts by pirates to hijack an Iranian commercial ship in the Red Sea…(presstv)[mappress]Source: presstv, August 2, 2011; View post tag: Naval View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Saves View post tag: cargo Share this articlelast_img

Exeter college receive donation from Goldman Sachs

first_imgGoldman Sachs has made a donation of £1.1 million to Exeter College, under the condition that the college provides £30, 000 a year in financial support for students via the hardship fund.The college’s rector Frances Cairncross said, “This very welcome gift from Goldman Sachs is tied specifically by the donor to relieving student hardship. It will be added to our endowment and will allow us, under our spending rules, to use just over £30,000 a year to help students in financial need.”Former JCR President Ed Nickell criticised the way the college manages their hardship provision. “From what I’ve gleaned, Exeter, uniquely among Oxford colleges, operates on a principle of charging all students as much of their living costs as possible, then retrospectively subsiding less well off students with hardship grants. Regardless of what one thinks of the principle, it has failed in practice.“Do we not have enough less well off students? Do they not apply? Either way, we should be worried. I tried tweaking the hardship grant system last year to include more anonymity and an eligibility criteria but it doesn’t seem to have made much of an impact.”The gift has been made as part of the bank’s charitable arm ‘Goldman Sachs Gives’. The bank has a history of supporting educational institutions charitably and have previously endowed half a million pounds worth of scholarships at Eton, and have donated to Balliol and Christ Church in recent years.Exeter students, who have just stopped a hall strike to protest the college’s £840 annual catering charge, welcomed the grant. Rowan Lennox commented, a PPE second year, “Great to see the much maligned finance sector making a serious contribution to social mobility.”However, some students noted flaws in the way the fund has been administered in the past. Second year Kat Farmer told Cherwell, “As someone who applies regularly for hardship funds, I understand how important they are to students. I’d really like to see college means test people for this money as currently you have to apply and prove you have run out of money.“Personally I really worry about my finances at uni and spend every holiday working fifty hour weeks to make sure I can afford the next term. This means that I often end up missing out on the hardship fund.”divert existing provisions elsewhere. In light of the ongoing student protests over the cost of the catering charge at Exeter, this donation could mean that more students are able to receive money from the college and mitigate the impact of the £800 fee.Alternatively, Exeter could maintain the scope of hardship provisions as it currently exists, the increased cash flow would then allow the college to reduce the catering fee for all students.The college have declined to comment on which of these two options they will take and have not been forthcoming with statistics regarding how many students benefit from already existing hardship funds and what the gift means in practical terms for students.last_img read more

Beazer’s Shades of Green

first_imgBeazer Homes announced earlier this month that it is expanding its menu of eSmart energy efficiency and indoor-air-quality options, and that it has launched a website designed to help market its products and demystify the systems and components intended to green its lineup.Beazer certainly is not alone among big homebuilders in developing a marketing plan around energy efficiency and sustainability. Pulte Homes has done it with its Azure Canyon and Villa Trieste projects in the Las Vegas area. But Beazer’s marketing effort also suggests that the conversation about what makes a home green could be expanding to an increasingly broad audience of current and prospective homeowners.Beazer’s new website, http://www.BeazerNewHome.com/, is among those attempting to help address a pervasive handicap to marketing green construction to customers who aren’t necessarily predisposed to buy green: the good stuff usually is buried in or behind the walls, or up in the attic. So the Beazer site emphasizes the principal economic virtue of sealing walls and wall-floor/wall-ceiling intersections (low energy costs), the water-saving potential low-flow fixtures and systems (with virtually no diminishment of convenience or comfort), and the health benefits of nontoxic finishes and properly circulated and filtered indoor air.Steps to whole-house efficiencyAt this point, the company, which operates in 16 states, has developed three eSmart construction standards, starting with a basic package whose components are now built into all new Beazer homes. It includes the use of 410A HVAC refrigerant, MERV 8 air filters, “advanced” framing, tighter-than-conventional air barriers, R-15 wall insulation, R-38 attic insulation, low-VOC paints and carpets, low-flow water fixtures, CFL bulbs throughout, programmable thermostats, an energy-use monitor; and an Energy Star dishwasher.The next tier up, eSmart Plus, is available in all of the markets the company serves. In addition to the features of the basic eSmart package, the upgrade includes a 14 SEER air conditioner, a choice of a high-efficiency furnace or a heat pump with a heating seasonal performance factor of 8.5, Mastic-sealed ductwork, jumper ducts in bedrooms, and an Energy Star water heater.eSmart Green, the top-tier package, is now available only in Houston and Phoenix but is expected to roll out in other Beazer markets throughout 2010. To the features mentioned above this standard adds a manifold plumbing system, tankless water heater, and spray foam insulation. It also includes upgrades to eSmart Plus equipment and finishes: a 15 SEER air conditioner, MERV-10 air filtration, a choice of a 95% efficiency furnace or a 9.0 HSPF heat pump, blower door and duct blaster testing, nylon 6 recycled carpeting, and a HERS inspection and rating for the completed home.The company’s marketing director, Mandy Holton Brooks, says that pricing for the three categories will vary from market to market and house to house, depending on its size. Beazer’s builder in Houston, for example, noted that per-square-foot prices on a 2,500-sq.-ft. home in that market would increase approximately $7 to $8 – or about $17,000 to $20,000 – when upgrading from one tier to the next.last_img read more

NTSB hasnt fully examined limo in fatal crash

first_imgWASHINGTON – Federal safety investigators have been unable to conduct a full examination of the limousine involved in a crash that killed 20 people nearly two weeks ago in upstate New York because local prosecutors are probing it as part of their case against the limo company’s operator.While a National Transportation Safety Board spokesman says it is working co-operatively with local officials, people familiar with the matter told The Associated Press on Thursday that investigators have privately expressed frustration over their inability to fully examine the limousine.They spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity in order to discuss sensitive conversations.The limo remains in the possession of New York State Police after the limousine company’s operator was charged four days after the crash with criminally negligent homicide.A state police spokesman said it could be several more weeks before the NTSB is granted hands-on access to the limo. The NTSB would get in line behind state investigators and the lawyer for the limo company’s operator.“The vehicle is the most important piece of evidence that will help ultimately determine the cause of the crash, and the extent of any criminal wrongdoing,” spokesman Beau Duffy said in a statement. “If the NTSB were allowed to handle evidence before it has been fully examined and processed by the state police and the defence, it would jeopardize the criminal case.”NTSB spokesman Eric Weiss said investigators were able to look inside the limousine briefly and have not conducted a full examination. But he stressed that the agency is working closely with state police.“We anticipate getting everything we need in a timely fashion,” Weiss said. “They have a criminal investigation to do. We have to accommodate that.”The federal agency is charged by Congress to conduct independent probes and can make urgent safety recommendations to address specific issues discovered during an investigation. The NTSB expects to release a preliminary report on the wreck in the next several weeks, Weiss said.The district attorney in Schoharie County did not immediately return a call from the AP seeking comment on Thursday.The limousine loaded with 18 people on their way to a birthday party for one of the occupants ran a stop sign and crashed at the bottom of a hill in the town of Schoharie. Everyone in the limo died, including four sisters, along with two pedestrians.Prosecutors allege the limousine company’s operator, Nauman Hussain, allowed an improperly licensed driver to operate an “unserviceable” vehicle. He has pleaded not guilty to the charge and has declined to comment on the crash.___Klepper reported from Albany, N.Y. Associated Press writer Mary Esch in Albany, N.Y., contributed to this report.last_img read more

Pak SC to hear Nawazs appeal for bail on medical grounds

first_imgIslamabad: Pakistan’s Supreme Court was Tuesday set to hear an appeal by country’s jailed former prime minister Nawaz Sharif seeking bail on medical grounds. Sharif, 69, is serving a seven-year imprisonment in the Al-Azizia Steel Mills corruption case at the Kot Lakhpat Jail in Lahore since December 2018. The Pakistan Muslim League-Nawaz (PML-N) supremo has suffered four angina attacks last week, according to his daughter Maryam Nawaz . The Sharif family is complaining that the government of Prime Minister Imran Khan is not providing health facilities to the former premier who has serious health complications. Also Read – Saudi Crown Prince ‘snubbed’ Pak PM, recalled jet from US Sharif filed an appeal on March 6 against a judgment by the Islamabad High Court (IHC) which on February 25 rejected his bail application on medical grounds in the Al-Azizia steel mills case. Several senior leaders of PML-N were also expected to be in the court on the occasion. A three-member bench headed by Chief Justice Asif Saeed Khosa and comprising Justice Sajjad Ali Shah and Justice Yahya Afridi will take up the petition. The former premier had twice submitted requests to the apex court for an early hearing of his application. Also Read – Record number of 35 candidates in fray for SL Presidential polls In January, he filed application in the IHC for bail on medical reasons as he developed heart-related medical complications in jail but it was dismissed. Three corruption cases – Avenfield properties, Flagship investment and Al-Azizia steel mills – were registered against the Sharif family by the anti-graft body in 2017 following a judgment by the Supreme Court that disqualified Sharif in the Panama Papers case in 2017. He was sentenced to 10 years in prison in the Avenfiled corruption case in July 2018 which was related to his properties in London. Later he was given bail in September. In December, the accountability court convicted him in the Al-Azizia graft case but acquitted him in the Flagship corruption case.last_img read more

Rich Data Poor Data

This story appears in ESPN The Magazine’s March 2 Analytics Issue. Subscribe today!In the 2000 edition of Baseball Prospectus, Keith Woolner identified 23 problems — avenues of analysis that had been dead ends for turn-of-the-millennium statheads. (For instance, No. 10: “Projecting minor league pitchers accurately.”) Woolner named these Hilbert Problems, after mathematician David Hilbert, who in 1900 outlined his own set of 23 vexing mathematical problems that he hoped would be solved in the 20th century.Of Hilbert’s 23 math problems, just 10 have been answered — not a great track record for more than a century’s worth of work. While Woolner’s baseball problems don’t lend themselves to mathematics’ hard-and-fast proofs, we have become a lot better at, say, “measuring the catcher’s role in run prevention” (No. 3). There’s still a margin of error in calculating how valuable Yadier Molina is to the Cardinals; nevertheless, the progress in baseball is remarkable.Analysts have made huge strides in “separating defense into pitching and fielding” (problem No. 1): The discovery that pitchers have relatively little control over balls in play has increased the value put on fielding and pitchers’ strikeout ability. And research into “determining optimal pitcher usage strategies” 
(No. 20) has led teams to transform struggling starters into top-shelf middle relievers with ERAs that would make Bob Gibson blush. Indeed, the shift toward pitching and defense reflects the rise of sabermetrics as much as the decline of juiced balls or juiced players.And all of this has taken 15 years, rather than since William McKinley was president. Sure, teams could still glean more about “assessing the ‘coachability’ of players” (No. 13) or “quantifying the manager’s impact on winning” (No. 22). But baseball analysts can’t complain, unlike their counterparts in other fields.As I describe in my book “The Signal and the Noise: Why So Many Predictions Fail but Some Don’t,” the rapid and tangible progress in sports analytics is more the exception than the rule. It’s important to remind sports nerds — who, as they look at streams of PER or wRC+ numbers, have become a bit spoiled — of this fair and maybe even obvious point. Because out there in the wider world, questions far more basic than Woolner’s remain unresolved. We still have tremendous trouble predicting how the economy will perform more than a few months in advance, or understanding why a catastrophic earthquake occurs at a particular place and time, or knowing whether a flu outbreak will turn into a bad one.It’s not for any lack of interest in data and analytics. For a while, I gave a lot of talks to promote my book and met a lot of people I might not encounter otherwise: from Hollywood producers and CEOs of major companies to the dude from India who hoped to be the Billy Beane of cricket.But there’s a perfect storm of circumstances in sports that makes rapid analytical progress possible decades before other fields have their Moneyball moments. Here are three reasons sports nerds have it easy:1. Sports has awesome data.Give me a sec. Really, I’ll only need a second. I just went to Baseball-Reference.com and looked up how many at-bats have been taken in major league history. It’s 14,260,129.The volume is impressive. But what’s more impressive is that I can go to RetroSheet.org and, for many of those 14 million at-bats, look up the hitter, the pitcher, who was on base, how many people attended the game and whether the second baseman wore boxers or briefs. It’s not just “big data.” It’s something much better: rich data.By rich data, I mean data that’s accurate, precise and subjected to rigorous quality control. A few years ago, a debate raged about how many RBIs Cubs slugger Hack Wilson had in 1930. Researchers went to the microfiche, looked up box scores and found that it was 191, not 190. Absolutely nothing changed about our understanding of baseball, but it shows the level of scrutiny to which stats are subjected.Compare that to something like evaluating the American economy. The problems aren’t in the third decimal place: We sometimes don’t even know whether the sign is positive or negative. When the recession hit in December 2007 — the worst economic collapse since the Great Depression — most economists didn’t believe we were in one at all. The recession wasn’t officially identified until December 2008. Imagine what this would be like in sports! We’re not sure how many points Damian Lillard scored last night, but we’re reasonably confident it was between 27 and negative 2. Check back in a few months.As if statheads weren’t spoiled enough, we’re getting more data all the time. From PITCHf/x to SportVU, we have nearly a three-dimensional record of every object on the field in real time. Questions once directed at scouts — Does Carmelo really get back on defense? What’s the break on Kershaw’s curve? — are now measurable.2. In sports, we know the rules.And they don’t change much. As I noted, there has been little progress in predicting earthquakes. We know a few basic things — you’re more likely to experience an earthquake in California than in New Jersey — but not a lot more.What’s the problem? “We’re looking at rock,” one seismologist lamented to me for my book. Unlike a thunderstorm, we can’t see an earthquake coming, nor can we directly observe what triggers it. Scientists have identified lots of correlations in earthquake data, but they have relatively little understanding of what causes one at any particular time. If there are a billion possible relationships in geology’s historical data, you’ll come up with a thousand million-to-one coincidences on the basis of chance alone. In seismology, for instance, there have been failed predictions about earthquake behavior in locations from Peru to Sumatra — all based on patterns that looked foolproof in the historical data but were random after all.False positives are less of an issue in sports, where rules are explicit and where we know a lot about causality. Take how we evaluate pitcher performance. It turns out that if you want to forecast a pitcher’s future win-loss record, just about the last thing to look at is his previous record. Instead, focus on his ERA, or better yet his strikeout-to-walk ratio, or maybe even the PITCHf/x data on pitch velocity and location.Why? Winning is the name of the game, and you win by allowing fewer runs than your opponent. So ERA says more about winning than a pitcher’s record. But you can do even better: Runs are prevented by striking out batters (and not walking them), and strikeouts are generated by throwing good pitches, which is why WHIP and strikeouts per nine innings also serve predictive purposes. Understanding the structure of the system gives statistical analysis a much higher batting average.3. Sports offers fast feedback and clear marks of success.One hallmark of analytically progressive fields is the daily collection of new data that allows researchers to rapidly test ideas and chuck the silly ones. One example: dramatically improved weather forecasts. The accuracy of hurricane landfall predictions, for instance, has almost tripled over the past 30 years.Sports, especially baseball, fits in this category too. In Billy Beane’s first few years running the A’s, the team had awful defenses — bad enough that Matt Stairs briefly played center. Beane theorized that because defense was so hard to quantify, he shouldn’t focus on it. His assumption turned out to be completely wrong. As statheads came to learn about defense, it proved to be more important than everyone thought, not less. Because the A’s were playing every day and Beane could study the defensive metrics like dWAR that emerged, he learned quickly and adjusted his approach. His more recent teams have had much-improved defenses.Contrast this with something like presidential elections, in which lessons come once every four years, if at all. Mitt Romney’s belief that the 2012 election was his for the taking (it wasn’t, according to both public polls and political science research) may have led him to underinvest in his get-out-the-vote operations. He underestimated Barack Obama’s popularity and his own ability to sway voters with his message. Republicans will have to wait until 2016 to improve their approach.It also helps that sports has a clear objective: winning. Obvious? Sure. But that’s not the case in other subjects. What counts as “winning” for the U.S. economy, for instance? Is it low inflation or high growth? If it’s growth, does it matter how the income is distributed? You have opinions about that, and I do too, and we might not agree even given all the data in the world.But the zero-sum nature of sports competition (there are a finite number of wins and championships to go around) also yields the greatest risk to continued innovation. When I was working for Baseball Prospectus a decade ago, most of the innovation was occurring among outsiders like us. It was competitive, but the point of getting a data “scoop” was to publish it for the rest of the world to see.Now almost all MLB teams employ a statistical analyst, if not a small gaggle of them. But those analysts are working on behalf of just one team — and have less incentive to share. At the MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference every year, the panels featuring current employees of major league teams are deathly dull because if the panelists said anything useful to a roomful of their competitors, they would be fired. Sports analytics runs the risk of losing the momentum of the past 15 years.Woolner, for his part, is now the director of baseball analytics for the Indians. No doubt he has 23 new problems to solve. But now it will take the rest of us longer to know when he has cracked them. read more

Ohio State field hockey shooting for Big Ten success this weekend

Then-sophomore forward/midfielder Maddy Humphrey during a game against St. Louis on Aug. 28. OSU won 5-0.Credit: Kevin Stankiewicz | Oller ReporterFollowing two consecutive losses against top-15 competition, the Ohio State field hockey team heads to the state of Michigan to do battle with two Big Ten rivals.The Buckeyes (3-5, 0-1) suffered a 5-1 loss at the hands of No. 11 Northwestern (6-2, 1-0), followed by a 2-1 defeat at No. 7 Louisville (7-1, 0-1 ACC). Despite the unfavorable outcomes, the weekend’s competitions provided a few Buckeyes with career milestones.Junior goalkeeper Liz Tamburro had 13 saves between the two matches, giving her 41 saves in the first eight games, which leads the Big Ten. Freshmen midfielders Esther Clotet-Alsina and Adelaide Penzone continue to lead the Buckeye field hockey newcomers in points with seven goals and one assist collectively.Friday’s match between Michigan (6-1, 1-0) and OSU will bring a decades-old rivalry to life. While the Buckeyes have not defeated the Wolverines since 2011, junior midfielder Carolina Vergroesen said the rivalry is sure to drive OSU to showcase the height of its abilities.“I think Michigan is always a game where it doesn’t really matter what either team’s done up to that time,” Vergroesen said. “It’s kind of nice because we bring out the best in each other because we’re all so hyped up for the game. It’ll be interesting to see where it takes us.”The Wolverines enter the weekend on a high note after commanding wins over Michigan State and Central Michigan the previous weekend. Senior Courtney Enge leads the offense with five goals, contributing to a team average of 3.5 goals per game. Junior goalkeeper Sam Swenson is third in the nation with a .818 save percentage, only allowing four goals in the last seven games.Michigan State (4-3, 0-1) began Big Ten play last weekend with a 4-1 loss to Michigan.  Still, the Spartans’ offensive line is a force to be reckoned with. The team averages 4.14 goals per game and is ranked second in the Big Ten for points and goals. Redshirt junior Kendal Anderson leads the offensive powerhouse with nine goals and seven assists for a total of 25 points. While Michigan State’s offensive edge differs greatly from Michigan’s defensive approach to the game, junior midfielder Morgan Kile said the Buckeyes’ edge is being able to modify their playing style from game to game.“We’re very adaptive in how we play other teams … which I think helps us in our success,” Kile said. “With Michigan, if we need to play a more vigorous, attacking style, then that’s what we’ll do and … if we take away (Michigan State’s) speed, then I think we should have them.”The Scarlet and Gray take on the Wolverines in Ann Arbor, Michigan on Friday at 7 p.m. The Buckeyes then travel to East Lansing, Michigan to face the Spartans on Sunday at 2 p.m.OSU vs. No. 8 Michigan History 6-1, 1-0Michigan holds a 35-26-2 advantage in the series against the Buckeyes, with the first game dating back to 1977. OSU has fallen to the Wolverines in the last five matchups, most recently a 3-0 shutout last October. Previous games include:10/31/15: Michigan 3, OSU 0 (Ann Arbor, Michigan)11/02/14: Michigan 2, OSU 1 (Columbus, Ohio)10/20/13: Michigan 2, OSU 1 OT (Columbus, Ohio)11/01/12: Michigan 1, OSU 0 (Iowa City, Iowa)10/14/12: Michigan 3, OSU 1 (Ann Arbor, Michigan)OSU vs. Michigan State History 4-3, 0-1Sunday’s game will be the 61st time that the Buckeyes and Spartans have faced off. OSU leads the series with a 36-21-3 record, despite having only beaten Michigan State once in the past five years. Previous games include:9/18/15: Michigan State 1, OSU 2 (East Lansing, Michigan)9/18/14: Michigan State 4, OSU 3 OT (Columbus, Ohio)11/08/13: Michigan State 2, OSU 1 2OT (Columbus, Ohio)9/28/13: Michigan State 3, OSU 2 (East Lansing, Michigan)10/05/16: Michigan State 1, OSU 0 (Columbus, Ohio) read more

Wrestling Former Buckeye found dead in his Pennsylvania apartment

Former Ohio State wrestler Nick Roberts was found dead in his Pennsylvania apartment late Saturday night. A cause of death has not yet been determined, although foul play is not suspected.The 23-year-old, who was wrestling for the University of Pittsburgh-Johnstown at the time, qualified for the 2013-14 NCAA championships in his first year with Ohio State as a redshirt freshman. After transferring, he won a Division II national title with Pittsburgh-Johnstown.“It is with great sadness that I share with you the loss of one of our university family, Nicholas S. Roberts,” said Pitt-Johnstown president Jem Spectar. “Nick was a senior in the class of 2017. We also know Nick as a standout member of our Mountain Cat wrestling team. Our thoughts and prayers go out to his parents, family, friends and loved ones.”Roberts had been out of competition after suffering a knee injury, but was honored during the team’s Senior Night on Feb. 7.Pitt-Johnstown Mourns Loss of National Champion Nick Roberts https://t.co/VmKrl4el41— PittJohnstownSports (@MtnCatAthletics) February 26, 2017 read more

Former Buckeye Greg Oden faces uncertain future after another injury setback

For the third time in his four-year career, former Buckeye and NBA No. 1 overall draft pick Greg Oden has suffered a season-ending injury. Oden missed the start of the season while rehabbing a fractured patella in his left knee, an injury that ended his 2009-10 campaign after 21 games. It was the same knee that required microfracture surgery Friday. The Portland Trail Blazers officially addressed the injury in a press conference Wednesday. Team trainer Jay Jensen said that even though the injuries occurred in the same knee, they were not related. “Greg’s patella fracture and his chondral injury that he has are not related although they’re in the same knee,” Jensen said. “They are two totally separate situations.” Oden missed his entire rookie season after having microfracture surgery on his right knee. Jensen said that in both cases, doctors didn’t know how the injuries occurred. “It’s the same procedure. It’s the same part of the bone that was damaged in his right knee,” Jensen said. Rose Backs, a physician assistant and assistant clinical professor in the Department of Orthopedics at Ohio State, said microfracture surgery is a technique used when a piece of cartilage breaks off in the knee and leaves a “pothole” where the bone is exposed. “This microfracture technique involves a series of holes that are either picked or drilled into the defect, or the pothole per se,” Backs said. “There’s a little blood clot that forms in that pothole, and what happens is scar cartilage grows over that. So in essence, it patches the pothole and the cartilage.” Backs said it could develop on its own. “There’s a number of things that we see commonly, and most commonly is probably the late effects of a previous injury, or even just spontaneously,” Backs said. Blazers coach Nate McMillan said Oden was devastated by the news that he would not be able to play this season. “Being so close to getting back on the floor, just all of a sudden this situation comes up and it’s like, ‘Here we go again’ for him,” McMillan said. “As I told him, he has to stay positive, and he has to keep believing. He’ll have an opportunity to continue to work to get back on the floor.” Oden has played in 82 out of a possible 260 games and will miss the 68 games remaining on the Blazers schedule this season. Kevin Durant, the Oklahoma City Thunder forward who was drafted immediately after Oden, is leading the NBA in scoring. He won the league scoring title last season. Oden will be a restricted free agent in the offseason. Team president Larry Miller said that Oden remains a part of the team’s long-term plans. The Oregonian reported that Miller foresees the team making an $8.8 million qualifying offer this summer, hoping to keep him in town for at least another season. “We will see where (rehabilitation) things are at that level … I don’t feel like I’m ready to give up on Greg Oden,” Miller said. “I don’t think anybody in our organization is ready.” The Blazers franchise shooting guard Brandon Roy is also struggling with knee injuries. Jensen said that Oden practically had his own room in the Jensen household, and the trainer was noticeably shaken by the news at the press conference. “This is a really tough day, for us to have to sit here and talk about someone like Greg who doesn’t deserve what’s going on because he’s worked his tail off to get to where he’s at to get ready to play basketball,” Jensen said. “So it’s not easy for me to sit here and talk about someone that I care deeply about.” Jensen said he felt like someone close to him had just died when he noticed the defect on an X-ray. He attempted to describe the injury in a way that everyone could understand. “For lack of a better term, it’s like hitting a nine iron and taking a divot out of the grass,” Jensen said. “It’s a hole in that part of the cartilage.” Oden declined to comment for this story. read more