Police officer fired after fatal shooting involving unarmed Black couple in Illinois

first_imgAlessandro Biascioli/iStockBY: MARK OSBORNE AND BILL HUTCHINSON, ABC NEWS(CHICAGO) — The police officer who opened fire on an unarmed Black couple in Illinois, killing a 19-year-old and seriously injuring his girlfriend, has been fired.The Waukegan, Illinois, officer, who has still not been named, was fired late Friday, according to Waukegan Chief of Police Wayne Walles.“In the evening hours of October 23, 2020 the City of Waukegan terminated the officer that discharged his firearm during that incident, for multiple policy and procedure violations,” Walles said in a statement.Marcellis Stinnette was killed Tuesday night when an officer opened fire on the vehicle he was a passenger in at about 11:55 p.m., according to police.Waukegan Police Department Cmdr. Edgar Navarro said earlier this week that Stinnette was sitting in the passenger seat of a “suspicious” car that was approached by an officer. The car fled and was later pulled over by a second officer.“That officer exited his vehicle and the vehicle that he was investigating began to reverse toward the officer,” Navarro alleged. “The officer then pulled out his duty weapon and fired into the vehicle that was reversing. Both occupants were struck.”Tafarra Willams, the mother of Stinnette’s child and diver of the vehicle, was struck in the hand and stomach and is still recovering in the hospital. Her injuries were not life-threatening.Both officers had been placed on administrative duty while the shooting was being investigated.The investigation is being handled by the Illinois State Police, a fact reiterated by the police chief in his statement Friday night.“The Illinois State Police are continuing to conduct their independent investigation,” he wrote. “Once that investigation has been completed, it will be turned over to the Lake County Illinois State’s Attorney’s Office for review.”Prominent civil rights attorneys Ben Crump and Antonio M. Romanucci announced earlier Friday that he would be representing the 20-year-old Williams.“Ms. Williams’ legal team will begin our own investigation into what happened during that incident, because we do not trust the police narrative in this case. We have seen over and over that the ‘official’ report when police kill Black people is far too often missing or misrepresenting details,” Crump said in a statement. “We will share our findings with the public when we have uncovered the truth.”Crump and Romanucci also represent the families of George Floyd and Daniel Prude, both killed by police earlier this year.Waukegan Mayor Sam Cunningham said at a news conference Wednesday he was worried about violent protests in the city.“I’m nervous because there’s a lot of uncertainty out there, there’s a lot of rumors flying around. I’m nervous for Waukegan,” Cunningham said. “We’ve seen this play out throughout this country. It just rips through communities and it takes years to rebuild.”Protests have remained relatively small and peaceful in the days since the killing.ABC News’ Devin Villacis and Will Gretsky contributed to this report.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Trinidad and Tobago Sets the Standard in the Fight Against Ebola

first_imgTo talk about this difficult task and other issues involving Trinidad and Tobago’s national security, Diálogo met with Brig. Gen. Phillips Spencer at the XIII Caribbean Nations Security Conference (CANSEC), which took place in Nassau, Bahamas, at the end of January 2015. Most of the countries in the Caribbean are heavily dependent on tourism. Even for Trinidad and Tobago, a twin-island country rich in oil, the tourism industry is an important component of the national economy, so a single case of Ebola could seriously affect its national product. A potentially 30-to-50 percent drop in tourism was very possible in the region, according to the Caribbean Community Chairman and Antigua and Barbuda Prime Minister Gaston Browne. Maybe that’s the reason why Trinidad and Tobago took this threat seriously and decided to appoint Brigadier General Anthony Phillips Spencer, the Vice-Chief of Defence Staff, as lead of the National Ebola Prevention Information and Response Team. DIÁLOGO: Do you think the discussion will move from talk to action? DIÁLOGO: Do you feel that every country in the region is at the same level of standardization as Trinidad? Brig. Gen. Phillips Spencer: Correct. A plan is not a basis for action. Similarly, an instrument is not a basis for implementation.The instrument needs to be institutionalized. All of the actors need to come together and determine how we will organize ourselves, align our efforts, coordinate our capabilities and capacities, and then proceed to action. I think the discussion at this CANSEC focused on how we will move from those instruments that have been approved for us in many instances by our governments to the effective execution and implementation of those measures that will deal with the many issues that threaten the security of our citizens. DIÁLOGO: In October of 2014, you were appointed as the lead of the National Ebola Prevention Information and Response Team. How is that effort going? Is it working well? Brig. Gen. Phillips Spencer: Information sharing is predicated on two imperatives. The first is trust. The second is standardization. Trust really goes to the issues of making sure that the risks involved in sharing information by any country can be managed and the best response, and the best context in which you feel comfortable accepting those risks is where there is trust. Building trust among security partners in the Hemisphere requires us to be sure that we have set the same standards for screening and vetting, and all of those things, making sure the level of professionalism in all of the agencies involved in information sharing is at a sufficiently acceptable level. So, two issues: it’s about trust, it’s about standardization. No country would want to know that it has, in good faith, offered sensitive information to another country to then discover that that information has not been treated with the appropriate level of confidence. Brig. Gen. Phillips Spencer: I can’t speak for the other countries. What I know is that when the CARICOM heads met in Port of Spain in early December, they agreed that all of its member states would work together and that we would be prepared to support each other. For instance, we have already received a request for assistance from Grenada, because it’s a matter of the capacity of the public health infrastructure in every country. Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Guinea were three countries in West Africa with very underdeveloped public health infrastructures, and it’s for that reason that containing the spread of the Ebola disease has proven to be so difficult. You’ll observe that in Nigeria, a country with a much more sophisticated and developed public health infrastructure, recovery for an incident was very swift. Brig. Gen. Phillips Spencer: Information sharing is predicated on two imperatives. The first is trust. The second is standardization. Trust really goes to the issues of making sure that the risks involved in sharing information by any country can be managed and the best response, and the best context in which you feel comfortable accepting those risks is where there is trust. Building trust among security partners in the Hemisphere requires us to be sure that we have set the same standards for screening and vetting, and all of those things, making sure the level of professionalism in all of the agencies involved in information sharing is at a sufficiently acceptable level. So, two issues: it’s about trust, it’s about standardization. No country would want to know that it has, in good faith, offered sensitive information to another country to then discover that that information has not been treated with the appropriate level of confidence. Brigadier General Anthony Phillips Spencer: I think we achieved a level of openness on the need for very concrete action on matters that have been discussed at CANSEC in the past. I think the focus on improving the regional training system is a clear indication of the success of CANSEC 2015. You note as well that the issue of information-sharing is so critical to our success when we work together to deal with threats like illicit trafficking; it was another year where clearly there is a deep commitment to taking action beyond many of the things that we have discussed in the past. Brig. Gen. Phillips Spencer: Absolutely. In fact, during the conference, you may have heard the Executive Director of CARICOM IMPACS, Mr. Francis Forbes, referring to JIATF-South as the ideal type of information sharing hub. It is because at JIATF-South, the standards are sufficiently high to afford and to convey that there is trust in the system for information sharing. Therefore anyone seeking to participate in information sharing through JIATF-South’s arrangement must be prepared to meet the standard. That’s why I spoke earlier about the importance of standardization. You can’t come to the game unprepared to meet the standards that are required. DIÁLOGO: But information sharing apparently works well when it comes to the Joint Interagency Task Force-South (JIATF-South), where different agencies from different countries work very close together. Is this a model that should be replicated? DIÁLOGO: Do you feel that every country in the region is at the same level of standardization as Trinidad? DIÁLOGO: During CANSEC 2015, there were many discussions about information gathering and sharing. Why is this so hard to implement? By Dialogo March 10, 2015 DIÁLOGO: Talking about transnational organized crime, two years ago, one of the biggest issues in Trinidad and Tobago was the fact that drugs were passing through the country, even though they were not staying, but the drug traffickers were leaving behind weapons that fell into the hands of the youth, especially young males. Did this problem diminish since? Brigadier General Anthony Phillips Spencer: I think we achieved a level of openness on the need for very concrete action on matters that have been discussed at CANSEC in the past. I think the focus on improving the regional training system is a clear indication of the success of CANSEC 2015. You note as well that the issue of information-sharing is so critical to our success when we work together to deal with threats like illicit trafficking; it was another year where clearly there is a deep commitment to taking action beyond many of the things that we have discussed in the past. Brig. Gen. Phillips Spencer: Absolutely. In fact, during the conference, you may have heard the Executive Director of CARICOM IMPACS, Mr. Francis Forbes, referring to JIATF-South as the ideal type of information sharing hub. It is because at JIATF-South, the standards are sufficiently high to afford and to convey that there is trust in the system for information sharing. Therefore anyone seeking to participate in information sharing through JIATF-South’s arrangement must be prepared to meet the standard. That’s why I spoke earlier about the importance of standardization. You can’t come to the game unprepared to meet the standards that are required. DIÁLOGO: During CANSEC 2015, there were many discussions about information gathering and sharing. Why is this so hard to implement? Brig. Gen. Phillips Spencer: Correct. A plan is not a basis for action. Similarly, an instrument is not a basis for implementation.The instrument needs to be institutionalized. All of the actors need to come together and determine how we will organize ourselves, align our efforts, coordinate our capabilities and capacities, and then proceed to action. I think the discussion at this CANSEC focused on how we will move from those instruments that have been approved for us in many instances by our governments to the effective execution and implementation of those measures that will deal with the many issues that threaten the security of our citizens. DIÁLOGO: What are you taking away from this conference? DIÁLOGO: Do you think the discussion will move from talk to action? DIÁLOGO: In October of 2014, you were appointed as the lead of the National Ebola Prevention Information and Response Team. How is that effort going? Is it working well? Brig. Gen. Phillips Spencer: I can’t speak for the other countries. What I know is that when the CARICOM heads met in Port of Spain in early December, they agreed that all of its member states would work together and that we would be prepared to support each other. For instance, we have already received a request for assistance from Grenada, because it’s a matter of the capacity of the public health infrastructure in every country. Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Guinea were three countries in West Africa with very underdeveloped public health infrastructures, and it’s for that reason that containing the spread of the Ebola disease has proven to be so difficult. You’ll observe that in Nigeria, a country with a much more sophisticated and developed public health infrastructure, recovery for an incident was very swift. Brig. Gen. Phillips Spencer: There is no question that in Trinidad and Tobago there are more illegal firearms than we would be comfortable with. The good news is that in 2014, the Trinidad and Tobago Police Service has succeeded in taking the highest number of firearms off the streets, more than they have ever taken off the streets in many years. It means that if illegal weapons continue to arrive and get left behind, it is our problem and our capacity to take them off the streets has improved. The next requirement is to prevent those illegal firearms from even entering our jurisdiction, so for that reason the Ministry of National Security is seeking to equip the Coast Guard with the necessary vessels and interceptors to improve the rate at which we are able to secure our borders from the infiltration and the importation of illegal firearms. DIÁLOGO: But information sharing apparently works well when it comes to the Joint Interagency Task Force-South (JIATF-South), where different agencies from different countries work very close together. Is this a model that should be replicated? DIÁLOGO: What are you taking away from this conference? To talk about this difficult task and other issues involving Trinidad and Tobago’s national security, Diálogo met with Brig. Gen. Phillips Spencer at the XIII Caribbean Nations Security Conference (CANSEC), which took place in Nassau, Bahamas, at the end of January 2015. Brig. Gen. Phillips Spencer: Yes. I think we are doing well. One of the key insights for responding to or being prepared to respond to the Ebola virus is a clear understanding that no single agency – Ministry of Health, Ministry of National Security– can respond effectively to this disease. And so once we were able to achieve a willingness on the part of the key actors to work together, we found that implementing a strategy that we have developed became very achievable. So, at this point, we have, in fact, been able to conduct several simulation exercises. We have done all our site-readiness surveys at all ports in Trinidad and Tobago. We have established vessel quarantine anchorages for any vessels entering our jurisdiction. At our respective airports, we have been able to establish isolation rooms in the case of Piarco and isolation wraps in the case of also at the Robinson Airport in Tobago, and we are now at a point where we have developed SOPs [Standard Operation Procedure] for several of the other areas and specific events for which we have to be ready and are now moving to simulation exercises. It really has required us to bring all stakeholders together, so we have not only public sector agencies, we have private sector agencies, too. We have civil society agencies, we have labor unions being represented as part of the team, because bear in mind that anyone who has a stake in preventing the arrival or the importation of the Ebola virus will want to be involved in the process. Apart from that, we have really succeeded at making sure that we reach out to the respective communities in Trinidad and Tobago. For instance, after my return to Port of Spain, we will meet with the Cora community. Cora Village is where the Ebola Treatment Center for Trinidad and Tobago has been established and therefore we need to engage directly with that community so they understand very intimately the extent to which we have taken measures to minimize risk to them as a result of having an Ebola treatment center in their community. So, I think we are doing well. Brig. Gen. Phillips Spencer: Yes. I think we are doing well. One of the key insights for responding to or being prepared to respond to the Ebola virus is a clear understanding that no single agency – Ministry of Health, Ministry of National Security– can respond effectively to this disease. And so once we were able to achieve a willingness on the part of the key actors to work together, we found that implementing a strategy that we have developed became very achievable. So, at this point, we have, in fact, been able to conduct several simulation exercises. We have done all our site-readiness surveys at all ports in Trinidad and Tobago. We have established vessel quarantine anchorages for any vessels entering our jurisdiction. At our respective airports, we have been able to establish isolation rooms in the case of Piarco and isolation wraps in the case of also at the Robinson Airport in Tobago, and we are now at a point where we have developed SOPs [Standard Operation Procedure] for several of the other areas and specific events for which we have to be ready and are now moving to simulation exercises. It really has required us to bring all stakeholders together, so we have not only public sector agencies, we have private sector agencies, too. We have civil society agencies, we have labor unions being represented as part of the team, because bear in mind that anyone who has a stake in preventing the arrival or the importation of the Ebola virus will want to be involved in the process. Apart from that, we have really succeeded at making sure that we reach out to the respective communities in Trinidad and Tobago. For instance, after my return to Port of Spain, we will meet with the Cora community. Cora Village is where the Ebola Treatment Center for Trinidad and Tobago has been established and therefore we need to engage directly with that community so they understand very intimately the extent to which we have taken measures to minimize risk to them as a result of having an Ebola treatment center in their community. So, I think we are doing well. Most of the countries in the Caribbean are heavily dependent on tourism. Even for Trinidad and Tobago, a twin-island country rich in oil, the tourism industry is an important component of the national economy, so a single case of Ebola could seriously affect its national product. A potentially 30-to-50 percent drop in tourism was very possible in the region, according to the Caribbean Community Chairman and Antigua and Barbuda Prime Minister Gaston Browne. Maybe that’s the reason why Trinidad and Tobago took this threat seriously and decided to appoint Brigadier General Anthony Phillips Spencer, the Vice-Chief of Defence Staff, as lead of the National Ebola Prevention Information and Response Team. DIÁLOGO: Talking about transnational organized crime, two years ago, one of the biggest issues in Trinidad and Tobago was the fact that drugs were passing through the country, even though they were not staying, but the drug traffickers were leaving behind weapons that fell into the hands of the youth, especially young males. Did this problem diminish since? Brig. Gen. Phillips Spencer: There is no question that in Trinidad and Tobago there are more illegal firearms than we would be comfortable with. The good news is that in 2014, the Trinidad and Tobago Police Service has succeeded in taking the highest number of firearms off the streets, more than they have ever taken off the streets in many years. It means that if illegal weapons continue to arrive and get left behind, it is our problem and our capacity to take them off the streets has improved. The next requirement is to prevent those illegal firearms from even entering our jurisdiction, so for that reason the Ministry of National Security is seeking to equip the Coast Guard with the necessary vessels and interceptors to improve the rate at which we are able to secure our borders from the infiltration and the importation of illegal firearms. yes I think you are doing a very good job, keep up the good work against human trafficking and exploitation for the benefit of the young people who are our future generation. I am Donna Dussard from Dover, St. Marylast_img read more

Leafs ride out regular season with weekend series against Rebels

first_imgSince the happy man in the nice red suit paid a visit to the NDCC Arena, the Leafs have been a dismal 8-8-1 and 0-5 since the final week of January.The Castlegar series is crucial to the Leafs playoff hopes as the Green and White enjoy a slim two-point advantage over the surging Beaver Valley Nitehawks.The Hawks, fresh from being swept by the Rebels last weekend, meet Spokane in a season-ending home-and-home series.The first game of the series goes at 7:30 p.m. in the Castlegar Arena Complex.The return contest is Saturday at 7 p.m. at the NDCC Arena.GAME NOTES: The Rebels success has been sparked by the one-two goaltending punch of Connor Beauchamp and Jordan Gluck. The latter leads the entire KIJHL with a 2.14 goals against average. And Beauchamp is not your regular backup, sitting third with a 2.32 average. . . .In contrast, Leafs Brett Soles is fifth in league goaltending but is 4-4 in his last eight games after starting the season with a 12-0 mark. Soles teammate Marcus Beesley, brought in to be the Nelson stopper, sits 21st in league netminding with a 3.29 goals against average. . . . Offensively Castlegar is led by veteran Stuart Walton with 73 points. Leafs top point man is Colton Schell with 66. . .The Rebels post an amazing 90-goal difference between offence and defence. . . . Only two Leaf players have scored more than 20 goals this season. So will the real Nelson Leafs please stand up.Ya the Leafs that reeled off a 10-1 November and not the squad that’s winless in February.The Nelson Leafs conclude the Kootenay International Junior Hockey League regular season this weekend with a home-and-home series against the Murdoch Division Champion Castlegar Rebels beginning Friday in the Sunflower City.The Rebels clinched the Murdoch title with a three-game win streak last weekend and are out to claim the KIJHL title with at least one victory against Nelson.The Leafs have been a shadow of the team that was tearing up the league in prior to the Christmas break.last_img read more

Carndonagh celebrates first ever Middle Eastern Festival – Pic Special

first_imgNew members from the Syrian and Kurdish communities in Carndonagh joined activists to celebrate the success of the Inishowen town’s first ever Middle Eastern Festival. The festival’s lead organiser, Siobhan Shiels from Inishowen Together, put the programme together in collaboration with members of the town’s Syrian and Kurdish residents.The running of events was handed over to the new Carndonagh residents themselves to share their expertise in areas including Arabic language and calligraphy, poetry, song, Islam, herbal medicine, Middle Eastern dance and cuisine. The group also made plans for future intercultural events and celebrations of the diversity in the Co. Donegal peninsula.Siobhan Shiels commented: “We had a wonderful opportunity here to learn from our new families about Middle Eastern life – what sets the culture apart and the many similarities and interests that unite us.“More than 200 people enjoyed the events led by our newest residents – so it was a really nice platform for them as facilitators to give the rest of the community a glimpse of some of the talents, rich traditions and skills that they add to Inishowen.She added: “There was an amazing community atmosphere throughout the week – everybody was really getting to know each other – and as much as it was a learning experience for many, the feedback was mostly about what fun it was. “It was such a family event – lots of children playing, singing, eating and dancing together; trying out new games from the other side of the world.”Helen Turton, who helped organise the festival alongside Ms Shiels, said: “The festival was a great success, it was wonderful to see everyone celebrating and learning about Middle Eastern culture together as a community.“Sunday’s event had something for everyone but highlights for me were definitely the Syrian food which looked and tasted incredible and Abdul and Malak telling the story of their journey from Syria to Carn.”The Syrian chefs who had prepared the banquet spoke of their experience of the event, with Asmaa Batal saying: “I liked seeing everyone enjoying the food we prepared.”One young Syrian couple, Malak and Abdul, also told their story of their escape from their war-ravaged home and journey across Turkey, before travelling across the Mediterranean on a tiny, tight-packed rubber boat to stay for months in tents in Greek refugee camps before being accepted by the Irish government to travel on to Ballaghadereen, where they were placed in shared accommodation for ten months before eventually being housed in Carndonagh. Suileman Darwish who also took part in many of the festival activities remarked: “I loved seeing everyone enjoying Arabic culture, playing and sharing food together.”The festival, which featured other events such as “The History of Syria”, “Arabic for Beginners”, “An Exploration of Kurdish Culture” and “Herbs for Life – Traditional Medicine from the Middle East”, looks set to be the first of many intercultural events in Inishowen.Photos of the event can be seen below.Carndonagh celebrates first ever Middle Eastern Festival – Pic Special was last modified: March 6th, 2019 by Shaun KeenanShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:CarndonaghInishowenMiddle Eastern Festivallast_img read more

South Africa’s junior mining sector vibrant

first_imgSouth Africa’s robust junior miningsector is an investment attraction. (Image: MediaClubsouthafrica.com. Formore free photos, visit the image library) MEDIA CONTACTS • Mte SapukaDatabase Manager: Beta SolutionsNedbank Capital Global Markets+27 11 294 1340 or +27 83 650 1141 RELATED ARTICLES • Mines, headgear, and the mind • Mine houses bullish about Africa• Key economic sectors: mining • China-Africa relations to deepenTessa KrugerSouth Africa’s junior mining sector has proved its viability by surviving the market collapse and flight from high risk and illiquid investments of 2008.The continued vibrancy of the sector is evident in the fact that the Nedbank South African Junior Mining and Exploration Index, an instrument tracking the performance of junior miners operating in South Africa, has shown a slow but steady recovery since it dropped to an all-time low towards the end of 2008.Nerina Visser, quantative analyst of Nedbank Capital, says the incidents of junior mining companies going out of business when the global economic crisis hit the resources sector in 2008 can be likened to the shaking of bad apples from a tree.Although the crisis caused the junior mining sector to drop by nearly half, from 8% of listed mining companies on the JSE to 5%, this is not an indication of the viability of the sector.“A good number of companies are still around, there are many junior mining operations and corporate action taking place in the sector,” says Visser.Steady recoveryThe junior mining sector in South Africa was born of new legislation in the form of the Mining and Petroleum Resources Development Act of 2006. The Act enforced a “use it or lose it” principle, stipulating that mining rights not used by mining companies to exploit minerals in the ground would revert back to the state.The legislation gave rise to the development of the junior mining sector in South Africa. Unused mining rights held by mining groups, but not used for years, were awarded to newly established junior companies that often showed themselves to be true mining entrepreneurs.The advent of the legislation saw the launch of the Nedbank South Africa Junior Mining and Exploration Index in the same year, with the aim of raising the profile of the sector which had been dominated by certain major mining houses for more than a century.The dominance of the majors, including BHP Billiton, Anglo American, Impala Platinum, Anglogold Ashanti, Anglo Platinum, Goldfields, Sasol, Harmony and Kumba, is still reflected in the resources sector of the JSE. The top 13 companies by size constitute over 95% of the total market capitalisation of all listed mining companies.The Junior Mining and Exploration Index, comprising 38 mid- and small-cap miners such as Aquarius Platinum, Uranium One, Wesizwe, Platmin and Great Basin Gold, reached a market capitalisation high of R130 395 602 (about US$18.3-million) on 6 March 2008 and a low R43 555 730 (about $6.1-million) on 3 February 2009.However, the index has recovered from the low of 931.89 points on 21 November 2008, soaring to 1 602.28 on 15 September this year, which points to a steady recovery in the smaller sector.Visser adds that the high of R130-million reached in March 2008 could be construed as a “bubble” or overvaluation of the sector during that phase, as the rapid growth that took place from 2005 to early 2008 was spurred by an excessive risk appetite in the market and was essentially unsustainable.Interest from foreign investorsVisser says the viability of the junior mining sector is further underlined by interest from foreign investors who are showing increasing interest in all mining investments. The global financial crisis has also caused a sifting, leaving behind the more serious investor who is prepared for the long haul.“Many investors are looking at the Chinese and interpreting the fact that they are coming into Africa to exploit resources as a long-term uptrend for mining on the continent,” says Visser.The Nedbank Junior Mining and Exploration Index shows that the junior sector has delivered average annual returns of 4.2447% to investors since 2006. The returns exclude the performance of dual-listed companies, as South Africa’s exchange control regulations prohibit trade of derivative instruments over inward dual listed shares.In August 2010, the Index was made up of junior miners in platinum (44%), gold miners (16%), non-ferrous metals (3%), diamond companies (1%), coal (1%) and general mining groups (35%).The largest constituents of the Index by market capital include Aquarius Platinum, Uranium One , Assore, Northam Platinum, Great Basin Gold and Eastern Platinum. As the individual stories of the junior miners show, some of these companies have built value for shareholders by growing into successful producers of metals and minerals, while others became great takeover targets.African Mining IndexJunior mining is also a feature of the strong, continued move of the global mining sector into the African continent. Mining companies are moving into Africa through both organic and acquisitional growth, as the continent shows the best growth potential, says Visser.This investment trend has given rise to the Nedbank African Mining Indices, a series of ratings which measures the performance of energy, metals and mining producers who operate primarily in Africa. The series includes an index for junior producers in Africa.Visser says it was necessary to establish the African Mining Indices to tell the African mining story, as so many mining companies working on the continent are listed in Australia, London and Canada, because they need access to huge amounts of capital needed for their African operations.The Nedbank African Mining Index for All Commodities – Junior Producers has a 17% exposure to the JSE in terms of market capital, which compares well with a 30% exposure to the Toronto Stock Exchange, 31% exposure to the Australian Stock Exchange and 17% exposure to the London Stock Exchange.In terms of commodity exposure, gold leads at 27%, diversified mining follows at 23%, base metals at 19%, energy at 18%, platinum group metals at 6%, while other commodities make up 7% of the index.The returns of the index covering junior producers in Africa for the year to date stood at 5.2% in August.STYLE–> (Image: MediaClubsouthafrica.com. For more free photos, visit the image library)last_img read more

SEA Games: Gilas cadets survive Thailand

first_imgTrending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games03:07PH billiards team upbeat about gold medal chances in SEA Games05:25PH boxing team determined to deliver gold medals for PH03:04Filipino athletes share their expectations for 2019 SEA Games00:45Onyok Velasco see bright future for PH boxing in Olympics02:25PH women’s volleyball team motivated to deliver in front of hometown crowd01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games00:36Manny Pacquiao part of 2019 SEA Games opening ceremony FIl-German Christian Standhardinger split a charity but hurt his left hand in the process and had to sit out for a few precious minutes.Teerwat Chantachot made it 68-65 which forced Gilas to push the panic button and saw emotions running wild.Kobe Paras lashed at the referee and had a shouting match with Kevin Ferrer at the bench as the rest of the bench tried to pacify the 19-year-old sensation.In what was billed as preview of the finals, Gilas tried use its brimming individual talent to good use by putting up a quick 10-points lead, 22-12, the first quarter.But the shooting went sour in the second quarter as Gilas allowed Thailand’s Chitchai Anati  and Chanatip Jakrawan to come away with crucial baskets.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ View comments Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo Soon enough the Thais were ahead, 33-32, but Christian Standhardinger quickly gave Gilas back the lead entering the second half.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Pagasa: Storm intensifies as it nears PAR Gilas cadets during a timeout against Thailand in the 2017 SEA Games basketball tournament. INQUIRER/ Marc Anthony ReyesKUALA LUMPUR—Under siege, Gilas Pilipinas relied on its individual brilliance — and not much on teamwork — to pull off an 81-74 victory over Thailand at the start of the 2017 Southeast Asian Games basketball tournament at MABA Stadium here.Kiefer Ravena sank a jumper and two free throws in the tension-filled last three minutes as the Philippines finally wiggled free from Thailand’s grip.ADVERTISEMENT Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his sidecenter_img LATEST STORIES Vietnam shuts out PH in men’s football Ravena’s free throw gave the Philippines the lead, 73-71, with four minutes left and then his jumper gave it more breathing space, 75-71.Asean Basketball League star Tyler Lamb nailed a triple to give Thailand a 46-45 lead early in the third as Gilas encountered difficulty smoothing its offence despite the presence of some of the A-list players in its fold.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingBut Lamb picked up his fifth and final foul in the early fourth quarter which turned things around for the Philippines.In the third quarter, Thailand even held a 66-64 lead with seven minutes left in the game. Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong protesters NATO’s aging eye in the sky to get a last overhaullast_img read more

Government to Auction Two Licences in Telecommunications Sector

first_imgGovernment is to auction two licences for use in the 700 megahertz (MHz) band, with a view to attracting new entrants into the telecommunications market.This was disclosed by the Minister of Science, Technology, Energy and Mining, Hon. Phillip Paulwell, during Tuesday’s (March 26) sitting of the House of Representatives.The licences will be awarded to the highest bidders, once their bids meet or exceed the reserve price, and upon being determined as “fit and proper” by the regulators. Both licences have a 15-year term. The licencees will also be required to deploy their network and/or services across 90 per cent of the country within five years. “I would like to underscore here how serious the Government is about the requirement to deliver mobile broadband services within the timeframe established; and if the timeframe is not adhered to, I will promptly withdraw that licence,” Mr. Paulwell said.The Government will begin pre-auction activities in early April 2013 with the issuance of an Information Memorandum which will be advertised internationally, as well, as posted on the websites of the Technology Ministry and Spectrum Management Authority (SMA).“From the date of the issue of the Information Memorandum until the issue of the Request for Proposals in May 2013, the Ministry and the Spectrum Management Authority will be actively working to sensitize the market as to the economic potential and the commensurate market value of this offering,” the Minister said.The Minister added that the Request for Proposal will remain open for one month, with the entire process completed by July 15, 2013.The 700 MHz band is the upper portion of the Ultra High Frequency (UHF) band, specifically channels 52 to 69 (698 MHz to 806 MHz). Internationally, the band was used for analogue television broadcasting; however, it has been allocated by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) for broadband wireless services.The band, which is considered to be low band spectrum, tends to be more penetrative and propagates farther, meaning that the signal goes through walls more easily, giving better coverage inside buildings, and requires fewer towers to cover a specific geographical area. “This dramatically reduces the cost of deployment, especially when compared to the costs of deployment of systems operating at higher frequencies,” Mr Paulwell said.Since commencement of operations in April 2001, the SMA has collected approximately $1.83 billion for Spectrum Licence Fees, and since the 2003/04 financial year, has collected $1.66 billion in Regulatory Fees, which cover the normal operating expenditure of the SMA.By Latonya Linton, JIS Reporterlast_img read more

Ishrat case takes curious turn

first_imgThe Ishrat Jahan case took a strange turn today. Relief for Intelligence Bureau officers – Rajinder Kumar and two others -came in an unexpected way. The Ministry of Home Affairs has refused prosecution sanction in the Ishrat Jahan fake encounter case. According to IH Syed, who appeared for Ishrat’s mother Shamima Kausar, as the MHA did not grant sanction to the investigative agency, charges cannot be framed against the officials, including Rajinder Kumar along with other sleuths.  Also Read – Working on improving tiesLegally speaking, this is because since permission under Section 197 of the CrPC (a mandatory and prior permission to prosecute any government servant in an offence) has not been granted, charges against the accused (IB officers) cannot be framed, According to the previous Central bureau of Investigation (CBI), the killing of Jahan and three others in a fake encounter in 2004 was result of joint conspiracy of Gujarat police and the IB. BJP spokespersons have stated that there was no evidence against Rajinder Kumar.  Also Read – Political parties and our RepublicAs it happens the man is now a BJP MP. Without jumping to the usual hyperbole, accusations and counter accusations surrounding the case it must be noted that this surely is the biggest case of conflict of interest that the Home Ministry has so easily dismissed.  On July 3, 2013, the CBI, the prosecuting agency of the encounter case, had filed a chargesheet and stated that Mumbra-based college girl Ishrat Jahan, Javed Shaikh alias Pranesh Pillai, Zeeshan Johar and Amjad Ali Rana were gunned down in a fake encounter on June 15, 2004 in a joint operation of IB and Gujarat Police.  During the course of the investigation the testimony by another officer claimed that Kumar met the 19-year-old woman, Ishrat Jahan while she was in illegal police custody before being killed. Another testimony by a cop claims that an AK-47 assault rifle, which the police said belonged to those killed, had actually been sourced from the Gujarat unit of the IB, to which Kumar belonged then, and planted on the four dead bodies. Ishrat Jahan’s family is likely to challenge the Union Home Ministry’s decision not to prosecute four IB officials in the alleged encounter case. It is indeed perplexing as to why the Home Ministry would try to stone wall the resolution of this vexed investigation. The CBI is not above board in this as well. Unfortunately, the CBI works in a way that raises the suspicion that, probably, it has arrived at a pre-conceived conclusion. Any evidence that comes contrary to that is brushed aside as inconsequential. Very remote and non-corroborative evidence is accepted by them. We have not heard the last of this case.last_img read more