Leicester 27 Northampton 16 – The Verdict

first_imgLEICESTER, ENGLAND – JANUARY 08: Marcos Ayerza of Leicester charges upfield past Ryan Powell during the Aviva Premiership match between Leicester Tigers and Northampton Saints at Welford Road on January 8, 2011 in Leicester, England. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) By Sarah Mockford, Rugby World Features EditorLeicester remain top of the Aviva Premiership after this hard-fought win over Midlands rivals Northampton at Welford Road.A few flashes of brilliance from Ben Foden aside, it was a game for the purists with the two packs fiercely competitive both in the set-piece and the breakdown – and it was Leicester’s strength up front that saw them close this game out comfortably.Northampton started the game with a bang, Ben Foden sprinting down the touchline to score in the first minute, but Leicester ended the half 11-10 in front thanks to the boot of Toby Flood and an archetypal forwards try from Louis Deacon.In the second half, however, the Tigers superiority up front told and they were awarded penalties time and again at the scrum while their ability to snaffle Northampton lineout ball provided them with yet more possession.Flood’s boot again came to the fore – he managed to put a horrific miss late in the first half to the back of his mind – and Marcos Ayerza crossed for the only try of the half. It came from after a strong run up the middle from Thomas Waldrom; the ball was recycled and Ben Youngs passed to the Argentina prop, who trundled over.Northampton’s best chance came from a neat interplay between Foden and Paul Diggin, whose kick downfield was fumbled by Geordan Murphy and allowed the wing to collect the ball and launch another attack, but the move only resulted in a Saints penalty. In fairness, neither back-line sparked into life. Foden troubled Leicester when he made breaks out wide but Saints simply didn’t  have enough ball in the second half to put the hosts under pressure.The Tigers for their part played intelligently, keeping Northampton pinned in their own half with a strong kicking game and generating momentum with strong drives from their forwards. They will be concerned about the lack of cohesion in their back-line, however. There will have been too many dropped balls and poor passes for the coaches liking.There is concern, too, for England coach Martin Johnson with both Chris Ashton (quad) and Courtney Lawes (knee) forced off injured in the first half while Shane Geraghty potentially fractured his eye socket just seconds into his appearance as a replacement and Geordan Murphy had to be carried off on a stretcher after hurting his ankle.Dylan Hartley’s performance might also have Johnson frowning. Not only were several of the Saints hooker’s lineout throws picked off by Leicester but his temperament is still questionable. He tends to get fired up too easily, getting into an early tussle with Manu Tuilagi, and it is in a cauldron like the Millennium Stadium, where England open their Six Nations campaign against Wales, that his temper could boil over and cost his country dearly.That’s for a few weeks, though. For now, it’s all smiles for the Tigers with a win over their arch rivals and a place at the top of the table while Northampton will be looking to make their two league games in hand.Leicester (11) 27: Tries: Deacon, Ayerza. Con: Flood. Pens: Flood (5).Northampton (10) 16: Try: Foden. Con: Myler. Pens: Myler (3). To find out what Richard Cockerill and Jim Mallinder think about the big game click hereTo read Rugby World’s verdict on Harlequins 17 Wasps 10 click herecenter_img TAGS: Leicester TigersNorthampton Saints LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Saints and Sinners: The weekend’s talking points

first_imgRhys Webb was Man of the Match, not for the first time, as he popped up in the right place at the right time to score two tries in the 31-20 triumph and kept his team on the front foot throughout.Talking of gifted, it’s hard to believe Jonny Gray is still only 20 years old. The Glasgow Warriors lock was the outstanding player in his team’s 21-18 win over Munster at Scotstoun, a victory which means the Scots are just one point behind the Ospreys in the table. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Goode startAs a Coventry City supporter, Andy Goode was probably more excited than anyone about Wasps’ move to the Ricoh Arena – also the home of the football club – and he celebrated his first match in his home city by scoring an Aviva Premiership record 33 points.Wasps made it a house-warming party to remember with their 48-16 win over London Irish but Goode’s try, eight penalties and two conversions left him chortling in disbelief. “What a Christmas present!” he said, before promising to drink some of the profits from the game at the club’s Christmas party. The SaintsStaying strongIt is six months since Owen Williams suffered a serious spinal injury while playing for Cardiff Blues in a tens tournament in Singapore and the former Wales centre has given an inspiring and courageous interview to BBC Wales’s Ross Harries, in which his positive mental attitude shines through.Williams has regained some movement in both arms, but has yet to do the same in his legs. Hard work in the gym and pool means he is making progress and, although he admits to having emotional ups and downs, he is determinedly looking to the future, not the past.“I don’t just want to lie there and waste away,” he told Harries. “You have to accept it and get on with it and try and make something of your life… you could just lie there and stay in bed, but that’s not the way I want to go.”He puts the injury down to bad luck, saying “I’ve been tackled like that 100 times before” and insists his fate has not watered down his love for rugby.You can watch the full interview via the BBC iPlayer, by looking up Scrum V (21 December) in their listings. It took until the 73rd minute before a scrum was actually completed. Ridiculous.I don’t often agree with Austin Healey but I had to applaud when the BT Sport pundit said he wanted to take the two front rows aside and say: “It’s not all about you – you are spoiling this game.” Hear, hear. Setting the bench-MarkHe will celebrate his 35th birthday on Boxing Day but Mark Cueto proved there’s life in the old dog yet as he raised his all-time Premiership try-scorer record by another notch with his first score of the season.Tom Varndell has been sneaking up on him, grabbing five tries this term while Cueto had only had one start for Sale Sharks since September before this weekend. But wearing the No 11 jersey on Friday evening, Cueto took a tricky pass, pirouetted and drove through a couple of defenders to score his 87th Premiership try during Sale’s 18-11 win over Exeter Chiefs. Varndell is his closest rival on 80 and astonishingly there is no other current player within 30 tries of Cueto’s total. Given the elbow: Dylan Hartley is sent off by JP Doyle after elbowing Matt Smith in the faceSeeing redDylan Hartley blotted his copybook once more this weekend when he was sent off for elbowing Leicester centre Matt Smith in the mouth during the East Midlands derby. Yes, Smith was pulling at him from behind and the Tiger might have made a meal of the contact, which didn’t actually draw blood, but if you elbow someone in the face you have to expect to be sent off.Hartley wasn’t the only player to leave his team in the lurch with a bit of silly indiscipline this weekend. Treviso replacement Romulo Acosto was shown a straight red for punching Edinburgh’s Fraser McKenzie. He landed repeated blows when McKenzie was already on the ground. Truly giftedIt’s the time of year when gifts are on everyone’s mind and the Guinness Pro12 team that gave its supporters the best pre-Christmas present is the Ospreys, who sit on top of the table thanks to their bonus-point win over Ulster. The best and worst of our great game was showcased this weekend, with courage and dignity sitting alongside violence and selfishness – but there was plenty of great Aviva Premiership and Guinness Pro12 action to enjoy too.center_img Officially greatIf Nigel Owens wasn’t already my favourite referee – and he probably was – he went up even higher in my estimation this weekend by taking charge of an under-12s match between Dowlais and Bedwas on Sunday. He could have sat at home with his feet up, but he headed out to referee two teams of delighted youngsters instead and Tweeted: “Was a pleasure to ref Dowlais v Bedwas U12s today. Grass roots rugby at its best. Kids well behaved. Credit to rugby.” Top job Nigel. Ford’s focusFor all his undoubtedly magnificent talent, George Ford had a tendency to just occasionally let himself down with an off-day from the kicking tee, but he looks like he might be eradicating that fault now.The latest example of his improved reliability with the boot came in Bath’s 39-16 win over Gloucester at Kingsholm – a record for the club in the Premiership at that venue. Ford kicked 24 points for Bath, punishing every Gloucester error.Plaudits for the victory should be shared across the whole Bath team as their defence kept Gloucester at bay through a long period of pressure in each half of the game. For more than 20 phases, the Cherry and Whites knocked on the door, but Bath would not let them through. Six of the worstThe Gloucester v Bath derby is usually a match to look forward to – a pulsating, tense thriller with a lot of pride at stake for both sides. Sadly, Saturday’s clash was reduced to a boring farce for much of the time by the two front rows who were unable to stay on their feet in the scrummage.Time after time after time the scrums collapsed before the ball was even put in, with both teams at fault at different times, as the six front rowers attempted to stay too low and lost their footing. Different view: Are any other club bosses looking in the same direction as Edward Griffiths?The SinnersIs that what you want?Harry Enfield used to play a comedy character whose catchphrase was: “Is that what you want? Cos that’s what’ll happen.” Saracens chief executive Edward Griffiths might wish to ponder that advice this week after his side annihilated London Welsh 78-7 in the Aviva Premiership. Welsh are clearly the poor relations of this league and if Griffiths gets his wish – expressed in a strong club statement last week – and has the Premiership salary cap scrapped, then more clubs will end up being outclassed week after week as a handful of richer clubs spend their way to an entirely different level.Yes, there might only be four or five clubs capable of winning the Premiership title even now, but 11 of the 12 can beat anyone on their day and that is one of the things which makes the league exciting and worth paying to watch.It’s true, the English clubs are not on a level playing field with the French in the European competitions, as the French can assemble stronger squads, but it is the Premiership which occupies the rugby players and fans of England for 24 weeks of the season and it would be turned into a farcical, two-tier competition if the salary cap was scrapped.The fact that clubs can employ one – soon to be two – marquee players outside the salary cap means English clubs can already offer Dan Carter and co as much money as they like, but they cannot sign a whole squad on unsustainable wages.The Saracens’ statement started with the extraordinary claim that the club is “creating a consensus among Premiership clubs to remove the salary cap”, yet their hashtag #scrapthecap was barely a blip on Twitter at the weekend. They said six other clubs already supported their stance, but club coaches from Leicester, Northampton, Harlequins, Bath and Gloucester all spoke in favour of the cap this weekend.Griffiths has done a huge amount to make rugby a better game in this country and beyond, but the idea of scrapping the salary cap would benefit the few at the expense of the many and should be resisted. Shouldering the burden: Luther Burrell did the work of two players for NorthamptonSuper SaintsNorthampton pulled off a stunning, extraordinary 23-19 win over Leicester Tigers having played with 14 men for three-quarters of the game after Dylan Hartley was sent off. The Saints took Tom Stephenson off to allow replacement hooker Mike Haywood to step into the front row and from that point Luther Burrell did the work of two centres in attack and defence, putting in a truly outstanding performance which earned him the Man of the Match award.Alex Waller, Ben Foden and Jamie Elliott scored the Northampton tries, but Burrell was the leading light in a magnificent team performance. A Goode day: Andy Goode set a new record for points in a Premiership match TAGS: OspreysSaracens last_img read more

Fran Cotton

first_imgCotton captained England three times and even led them in the World Cup Sevens in 1973 – extraordinary for a prop.His playing career ended with a leg injury in 1981 and six years later he set up the Cotton Traders clothing company with team-mate Steve Smith. Brain and brawn combined to make Fran Cotton an all-time great. The son of a good rugby league player, young Fran took up union at grammar school, was capped by England while studying PE and maths at Loughborough University, and has become a successful businessman and rugby administrator later in life.His 6ft 2in frame helped him become an outstanding prop who could play on either side of the scrum. He had a hard edge, and after he punched his fellow Lion and tighthead rival Sandy Carmichael at public training on the 1974 tour to South Africa, he earned the Test spot and played a key role alongside Bobby Windsor and Ian McLaughlan for the unbeaten tourists.Windsor said: “Frannie was massive on that 1974 Lions tour, like a great English oak.”In fact, the man from Wigan never lost a match in South Africa, playing there with England in 1972 and returning with the Lions in 1980, when he headed home after four appearances due to a heart condition.Cotton’s versatility meant he played loosehead in England’s Grand Slam-winning team in 1980 and on the 1977 Lions tour to New Zealand, when he was part of a pack so dominant that the All Blacks resorted to three-man scrums in a bid to get the ball straight out. During that trip photographer Colin Elsey snapped the iconic ‘mud man’ picture of Cotton, his face caked in mud, his eyes gleaming through. Cotton was banned for a decade by the RFU for earning money from writing a book, but was welcomed back to union in time to become manager of the 1997 Lions tour to South Africa. His success as a Lions player, his understanding of the Springbok mentality and his management expertise and attention to detail meant he played a key role as the Lions upset the odds and beat the Springboks. No doubt the South Africans respect Cotton, but they must also be sick of the sight of him!For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here. Major teams: Coventry, SaleCountry: England
Test span: 1971-81England caps: 31 (31 starts)Lions caps: 7Test points: 4 (1T)center_img TAGS: The Greatest Players LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Rise in Christians has China’s churches, government looking for help

first_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group The Macau Protestant Chapel, aka the “Morrison Chapel.” ENS photo/Lynette Wilson[Episcopal News Service] A small white chapel of Western design sits amid the high-rise residential buildings of Macau, a former Portuguese colony now administered by the People’s Republic of China. Popularly known as the “Morrison Chapel” in honor of Scotsman and Presbyterian minister Rev. Robert Morrison, the first missionary to land in the region in 1807 and the first to translate and publish the Bible in Chinese, it was the first Protestant chapel built on Chinese soil.From there, Protestant Christianity spread throughout China.“This is where the gospel came to the Chinese,” said the Rev. Stephen Durie, an Anglican priest and pastor of the chapel, officially christened a century ago as a nondenominational House of God, during a tour of the grounds in late February.Christianity actually first reached mainland China in the seventh century during the Tang dynasty but didn’t begin to flourish until the 19th century. Later, in 1949, Mao Zedong banned the religion following the Chinese Revolution. It didn’t resurge until after his death in 1976 and the end of the Cultural Revolution. Now, with the communist central government’s sanction and oversight, Protestant Christianity has spread dramatically, manifesting in an unprecedented post-denominational, independent fashion.And the Chinese government wants to work with the Episcopal Church, said Peter Ng, the church’s global partnerships officer for Asia and the Pacific, in an interview with ENS in China. “The government sees the Episcopal Church as a relevant voice in modern society.”Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori and Minister Wang Zuo’an during a meeting at SARA’s headquarters. ENS photo/Lynette WilsonDuring a recent three-week visit to Anglican Communion provincial churches and Episcopal churches in Asia, Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori visited China at the invitation of the China Christian Council (CCC) and the Three-Self Patriotic Movement (TSPM). She attended meetings in Shanghai, Nanjing and Beijing, where she met with the minister of the State Administration for Religious Affairs (SARA), the Chinese government agency that oversees religious practice.Jefferts Schori’s visit marked the first time a presiding bishop of the Episcopal Church met with government officials in China.In the United States, the problem is “there are many bishops and not many believers,” joked Minister Wang Zuo’an in Mandarin through an interpreter. “In China, [there are] so many believers who can’t find a bishop.”Wang’s joke rings true for the Chinese church; the dramatic increase in Christians over a short time has challenged it to train pastors adequately and acquire land, especially in densely populated urban areas, on which to build churches. And it has challenged the atheist government to protect the rights of Christians, as well as other believers and nonbelievers.Wang singled out having enough “properly trained pastors” as the biggest problem the church faces. “If there are no good pastors during the process of development, great problems will happen,” he said. Christianity’s rapid development in China has drawn much attention from nonbelievers, and it’s important for Christians “to set a good example,” he added.The CCC must not only find its own way to develop, but also look toward others and learn from their development, said Wang.The CCC and TSPM form the official, government-sanctioned Protestant church in China. (“Three-Self” stands for self-governing, self-supporting and self-propagating.) TSPM serves as a liaison between churches and government, while CCC focuses on church affairs.SARA serves as a bridge between religion and the central government and coordinates relationships among religions to make them all equal, said Wang. Besides overseeing the TSPM, SARA also oversees the four other sanctioned religious groups: Muslims; Roman Catholics, of which the government’s Chinese Patriotic Catholic Association, not the pope, is the supreme authority; Buddhists; and Taoists.“That is another phenomenon in China … there’s more harmony between religious and nonreligious people. When conflicts do happen, an organization like SARA is needed to safeguard the lawful rights of people,” said Wang. In China’s history, he added, meaning since 1949 and the formation of the People’s Republic, there have been no religious wars or conflicts, nor one dominant religion. Recently, however, he said, Muslim populations have clashed in the western part of the country.During her four-day visit to China, Jefferts Schori met with the minister of SARA and attended meetings with church leaders; Nanjing Union Theological Seminary faculty; and staff from the Amity Foundation, a faith-based social service provider.“I think it was a very important learning experience for us, from the sublime to the ridiculous, figuring out the differences between CCC and TSPM,” said Jefferts Schori in an interview with ENS after leaving China. “It’s also very helpful to talk to people face-to-face because we deal with many caricatures of what China is like and what the religious environment in China is like. And I think we got a much more nuanced view of what it means to be a Christian in China today.”During her meeting with SARA, Wang said that the churches and governments of China and the United States should strengthen their relationships through the continued exchange of information, and “the Chinese church and America, especially the Episcopal Church, should have an understanding and support each other,” he said.Jefferts Schori explained to Wang and his staff that one of the roles of the Episcopal Church’s Washington, D.C.-based Office of Government Relations is listening to the cares, concerns and perspectives of the faith community in relation to the government, and that it also exists to challenge the government.“Part of the role of the Episcopal Church is to promote harmony and peace in society … and to bring peace on earth in our own day,” she said. “And to challenge our own government in the ways it builds or doesn’t build peace.”That includes very delicate international situations, such as implementing a two-state solution in the Middle East, where a peaceful solution’s impact would be felt around the world, she said. Similarly, peace on the Korean peninsula would have a positive regional impact, she said.Before visiting China, Jefferts Schori visited the Episcopal Church in South Korea, where her colleagues expressed concern for North Korean refugees in China being sent back to North Korea.“Our faith teaches us that large governments need to build peace in places that they have the ability to do so,” she told Wang and his staff, adding that the church sees itself as prophetic. “[Together] the faith community and governments have a much greater capacity to build peace around the world. And we seek partnerships in that work wherever we can find them.”Unlike some religious groups in the United States, the Episcopal Church understands itself as empowering people of faith to take their place in society and “function as whole people,” said Jefferts Schori.Christianity no longer an ‘alien’ religionThe former Holy Trinity Anglican Cathedral in Shanghai. ENS photo/Lynette WilsonWithin Chinese society, churches existed before 1949; after that year and the Korean War, when all the missionaries left, there were Chinese churches, the Rev. Kan Baoping, CCC general secretary, during a meeting in Shanghai. The council and TSPM share a headquarters there on the campus of the former Holy Trinity Anglican Cathedral, which is in the process of being restored.“All of a sudden the church lost all its resources, and after that we understood what the church is in China,” said Kan. The Three-Self movement was born in the early 1950s to bridge the gap between church and state, he said.During that decade, TSPM began to embrace Christianity as an indigenous religion, and all Protestant worship became nondenominational. In 1978, China’s constitution was modified to guarantee the freedom of religion, with some exceptions. The CCC formed in 1980.“Some people overseas may not understand why the church in China focuses on the Three-Self principles,” said Gao Feng, CCC’s president, in Mandarin through an interpreter. “In the 1950s, Three-Self was initiated by Christian leaders. Before that, many churches in China had already called for independence.”Between 1840-1842, he elaborated, Western forces invaded China and adopted “patronage” treaties that protected the rights of missionaries. These treaties were negotiated between China and the British Empire after the First Opium War, which began in 1839 as a result of trade disputes and poor diplomatic relations.“Chinese people thought [the treaties] were a big humiliation to the dignity of the nation of China and hated the Western military powers and missionaries from other countries,” said Gao.From there, he explained, Christians recognized the importance of starting an independent movement in which Christianity no longer was referred to as an “alien religion,” thus letting it develop within the unique Chinese context.The intention was: “To build a church for God in this land.”The role of the China Christian CouncilThe Rev. Gao Feng, of CCC, and Elder Fu Xianwei, of TSPM, during a meeting in Shanghai.. ENS photo/Lynette WilsonThe CCC operates seven departments: training, social services, research, overseas relations, publications, editorial and administration. The council is headquartered in Shanghai, with local councils established in cities and regions.“Our vision is to serve all Christians in China, no matter if they belong to registered or nonregistered churches; once they become Christians we regard them as brothers and sisters,” said Elder Fu Xianwei, chair of the national TSPM. The council, for example, provides Bibles and hospice care, supports theological education and provides church buildings for “entrepreneurs” in China who have “volunteered to organize their own fellowships.”For example, Fu said, “in some regions there are no formal church buildings; if we see a need, we help set up churches there to include all Christians.” The situation, he added, is “very complicated and cannot be solved in a day.”Many unregistered churches have started to have contact with registered churches, he said, noting that he believes tensions will begin to lessen very soon. “The situation is quite complicated, still, but my colleagues and I have strong convictions that we should serve all Christians in China.”Besides unregistered house churches, Christianity in China has seen the proliferation of mega-churches, whose charismatic leaders who prefer to go it alone and manage their churches as private businesses, and have proved a challenge to CCC/TSPM, said Kan.The Chinese government in Western media often is criticized and accused of human rights abuses for detaining religious leaders. But for the most part, the religious leaders that ENS met in China said they thought they had an open relationship with the government.Ng explained it this way: TSPM and CCC are the official Protestant church, but the government has taken a more flexible approach to house churches so long as they don’t violate the law.In an interview with ENS in Hong Kong after Jefferts Schori’s visit, the Rev. Peter D. Koon, general secretary of the Province of Hong Kong Sheng Kung Hui and a Shanghai native, offered his perspective and said the full story of freedom of religious expression in China wasn’t always reported.Concerning reports of religious persecution of Falun Gong, for example, “Fifty percent of the population isn’t well educated, so they will be very easily led,” he said. “So it’s very dangerous [as a means of control and brainwashing].”On its website, Falun Gong calls itself an “an advanced practice of Buddhist self-cultivation.” It has been outlawed by the Chinese government and is considered a “cult” by some in both East and the West. Followers of Falun Gong believe that illness and misfortune result from karmic retribution and refuse medical treatment.In another example, there was a complaint when the government closed down two churches in a city of 120 churches, he said. One was an illegal structure, and the other was in a crowded community and the neighbors complained, he said.Many of these churches have links with overseas churches that have money and will help them, said Koon. “This is the case most of the time. Other times, they want to immigrate, so they make a big deal.”He concluded, “The government wants to use us as an agency to promote unity and harmonious society. They want to work together with all the religions.”With baptism comes membershipChina has 56,000 registered Protestant Christian churches and between 20 million and 40 million registered Christians. An exact number is difficult to discern for several reasons, including apprehension about officially registering because some people fear a second “cultural revolution,” church leaders said.During the 1966-76 Cultural Revolution, the government forbade Christian worship of any kind, forcing believers underground. Some were jailed, like the Rev. Xinli Yu, Beijing Christian Council president and principal of Beijing’s Yanjing Theological Seminary.The Rev. Xinli Yu, president of the Beijing Christian Council. ENS photo/Lynette WilsonBorn in 1939 and the son of a pastor, Xinli “made trouble” while studying in seminary before the revolution started, was arrested and spent 22 years in a labor camp. Released from the camp in the 1980s, he went to work for the church as a maintenance man and in 1984 was ordained a pastor, he said in Mandarin as interpreted during a meeting at the headquarters of the Beijing council.In Beijing, a city of 20 million people, there were 200-300 churches before 1949. Today, there are 21, each with more than 1,000 members. One, headed by a woman, the Rev. Du Feng Ping, has more than 5,000 members and conducts four to five services each Sunday.Besides their congregations, pastors and their staff members often oversee “meeting points.” In Beijing, nearly 1,000 meeting points serve between 70-80,000 believers. They work like this: At first, 10 or 20 believers gather in a house. Eventually the group outgrows its space and approaches the Beijing Christian Council for help in finding a larger space. Often, Xinli said, SARA assists the church in land negotiations in resistant communities.“The fact that there isn’t this denominational competition, I think, is a radical gift to the rest of the world, a powerful gift,” said Jefferts Schori, reflecting on the meetings. “And we didn’t talk to anybody who thought that there was a major difficulty with meeting points, small family-sized Christian groups. They saw them as seedbeds for large congregations; that’s how large communities start. And there seems to be some fluidity that we don’t see reported in America, in moving between those groups.”Each year in Beijing, 1,000 people on average are baptized and become church members. To become a member, a person must attend regularly for one year, take a special catechism class, then talk to the pastor and be baptized, Xinli said, adding that children typically are not baptized.Baptism is a conscious, individual choice, Xinli said. “Children don’t have such ability.”Training young pastorsAs elsewhere, in Beijing the emphasis has been on training young pastors to meet the growing demands of increasing membership. More than 100 young pastors – 60 percent of them women — and church workers are in Beijing. Many were not related to the church before 1980 when, following the open policy, young people came.“Young believers don’t know about denominations,” Xinli said. “When I was young, I was Assembly of God.”In 1979, China’s National People’s Congress passed “reform” and “open” policies, which brought the country into contact with the outside world.As the church in China grows and as the demand for qualified pastors increases, young people are flocking to China’s 21 seminaries, with the national seminary being Nanjing Union Theological Seminary.Students studying at Nanjing Union Theological Seminary. ENS photo/Lynette WilsonThe seminary, which opened in 2009, is among 15 universities in what is called “University Town,” a suburban area of new construction, including strip malls, a giant stadium and roundabouts outside Nanjing.The provincial government donated the land for the new seminary, and the central government financed part of the construction, with the balance raised through individual donations, the Rev. Yilu Chen, the seminary’s executive vice president, said in Mandarin through an interpreter.“The government’s viewpoint on religion has changed a lot. In the past, the government thought religion was poisonous to people and that it prevented society’s development,” he said.“Beginning with the 17th Communist Party Conference, the party said religion can make cultural, social and economic contributions, and from then on the emphasis has been on the positive role that religion plays … talk of religious freedom is outdated now, and now we should talk about playing a positive role in society.”Much like seminarians in the Episcopal Church, seminarians in China must be sponsored by a congregation. Once they complete their studies, they return to serve for three years in the sponsoring congregation before being ordained, said the Rev. Manhong Melissa Lin, associate professor of Christian ethics at the Nanjing seminary.“We believe that if younger people can be trained in seminary, they can serve in churches for a long time,” said Yilu.There are 330 seminarians with an average age of 25 enrolled at Nanjing, which offers a four-year bachelor of theology degree and a three-year master of divinity degree. A doctoral program is slated to be added eventually.The campus can hold 500 seminarians; this year 500 people applied for 115 open slots. Seminarians come from all of China’s mainland provinces except Tibet. Tuition is 4,000 yuan, or around $600.The seminary, Yilu said, urgently needs qualified professors and teachers. It has sent six professors overseas to earn doctorates and also relies on visiting professors from overseas. It also is looking at partnerships. In February 2011, CCC and TSPM church leaders, accompanied by government officials, visited the Episcopal Church Center in New York to discuss ways to work together.Playing a positive role in societyCharitable work is another area in which the Chinese Church has looked to the Episcopal Church for help, with a delegation, including SARA’s deputy minister, visiting the church center in August 2011.Churches engaging in social service works is somewhat new territory, for both them and the government, as evidenced in a the Feb. 28 headline in the South China Morning Post, “New Controls on Religious Groups’ Work.” The story said that the government recently tightened controls on religious groups to stop them from spreading religion and “undermining national interests” by accepting donations from overseas entities that come with political and or religious conditions.(Similar to the United States, China doesn’t allow churches to proselytize when operating as social-service providers.)During a meeting in Shanghai, Kan, the CCC general secretary, said the government used to frown upon churches providing social services to communities out of concern for that they would share their message and recruit members, but that its stance has changed in recent years.“Now the government is encouraging the churches to exercise their social-service arm,” he said, adding that the church has responded by offering training and resources to churches.An Amity Printing Co. employee at work. ENS photo/Lynette WilsonThe Amity Foundation, founded by Anglican Bishop K.H.Ting and other Chinese Christians in 1985, was one of the first nongovernment organizations and the first faith-based one established to address the needs of society. Today it provides social services ranging from education and medical assistance to disaster relief and helping rural farmers take advantage of solar energy. Episcopal Relief & Development is one of its strongest partners, said She Hongyu, assistant general secretary of Amity, during a presentation in Nanjing at the Amity Printing Co., which is part of the foundation.Despite partnerships, the Amity Foundation has moved away from foreign donations.“We started out 100 percent dependent on donations from abroad. In 2004, we established our own fundraising in China,” She said.This year, Amity Printing is on schedule to print its 100 millionth Bible; profits from the printing of Bibles in 75 languages and shipping to 70 different countries and regions help finance the foundation’s work.Jefferts Schori said that she was struck by the government’s change in attitude toward religious bodies engaging in social services.“There is a parallel with Cuba. When the state discovered what religious communities could do for the benefit of the larger community, the state began to support at least the existence of those religious communities,” she said, “if not to actively support their development and growth, which I think the Chinese government has done, providing land for the seminary in Nanjing and building the facilities, they see that as a benefit.“Fidel [Castro] changed his mind something like 25 years ago and remembered his own Jesuit upbringing and the state partners with the church in Cuba on community service, and they are quite supportive, they make special provisions for the churches.”In Cuba, unlike in China, government members can hold religious beliefs.In addition to Ng, Alex Baumgarten, the Episcopal Church’s director of government relations; the Rev. Charles Robertson, canon to the presiding bishop; and Richard Schori, the presiding bishop’s husband, joined Jefferts Schori in China, Hong Kong and Macau.“I am surprised and in awe of a church that has encountered so much social change over the last six decades and nonetheless is able to be a positive and consequential force in shaping the society around it for the better,” said Baumgarten in an interview with ENS upon leaving China.“I don’t think I was any more struck by it than with the Amity Foundation. In its work you see the church seeking to transform the world around it at every single level.”— Lynette Wilson is an Episcopal News Service reporter and editor. She traveled with the presiding bishop in China, Hong Kong and Macau. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Rev. Carol L Huntington says: Rector Bath, NC Rev. Margaret Hodgkins says: Rector Albany, NY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem March 14, 2012 at 8:56 pm As the grandson of a British missionary, who became an American citizen, from a family who spent up to the 1949 Revolution, I have felt the pull of China all my life. First, as being born and raised in Japan, and as an adult working as a senior level fundraising officer at Japan Society, I took an educational sabbatical to study in London East Asian Art and Culture, I turned my focus to China, where I earned an MA in Chinese Art and Culture at London’s prestigious School of Orientaland African Studies (SOAS) at the University of London, where I studied Mandarin and studied at Sotheby’s Institute of Art in their East Asian MA program. It is impossible to understand contemporary China without knowledge of its incredibly rich visual culture and language, I am now an art historian of Chinese and Japanese art and culture, I am a deeply committed member of Trinity Church Wall Street where I have felt my beliefs in Christ and the welcoming spirit of the Episcopal Church can, at this moment in history, build some successful partnerships. My discernment as a newly confirmed Episcopalian came early when I felt God’s call to bring my family history full circle, with a life time of building blocks in understanding the complexities of the early 20th century missionary experience in China, to the 21st century, in which China is opening its doors, starting with the Sichuan earthquake, when China opened its doors to help from outside, from churches, governments, and NGO’s. Despite its great successes, in my visits to China, there is still massive poverty, and as materialistic needs and wants are answered, there is a thirst and a hunger for spiritual nurture. Since the Sichuan earthquake, there has been an opening up of a timely dialogue at all levels, from the student level to upper echelons in the government to see how Christianity can be a positive force. This article confirms my strongly held beliefs that China can be a welcoming partner, with the respectful manner in which the Episcopal Church spreads the Gospel by “walking the walk”. With my family legacy in China through the late 19th century to now, my understanding of China’s deep and rich culture, and bright future, I pray that God will give me the strength to use my knowledge in building ecumenical bridges with a country. I feel a sense of excitement that I have a deep well of knowledge,and a strong desire to participate in bringing Christ’s message to the world’s second largest economy through the Episcopalian Church. I am finding my own path through Trinity Church and the great number of faith-based organizations, the Asia Society, my continued studies of China’s distinguished past. The Chinese, after the Cultural Revolution, are once again taking great pride in their over 5000 year culture, which has contributed so much. The Chinese delight and respect foreigners who take an interest in their cultures, and with that knowledge and interest, I feel that with God’s help I can be a positive force for Trinity Church and the larger Anglican Communion. I would welcome response and ideas of individuals and organizations I should talk to. I have decided to devote full time to these efforts, and to give my service to God by working to develop relationships with China. I can be contacted at [email protected] March 15, 2012 at 2:26 am My daughter has moved from Shanghai to Kunming. She is unable to locate a church in that city. Although Episcopalian, she was more comfortable in the Roman Catholic Churches in Shanghai than the Protestant. Can anyone help her locate a R.C. community or a Protestant one in Kunming? Rector Shreveport, LA Rise in Christians has China’s churches, government looking for help John Kirk says: March 16, 2012 at 9:12 am Thank you for this fascinating article. The radical ecumenism among Chinese Christians, hailed by Presiding Bishop Jefferts-Schori, is deeply inspiring for the Anglican Church’s interfaith and interdemoninational efforts. The Church in China appears successful in its primary focus to serve, and thus avoids the factionalism that gets in the way of the crucial Gospel message to love one another. Without proselytizing, an organization like Amity–which I am gratified to see is supported by ERD- – is spreading the Word, “walking the walk,” and playing a vital role in the new society of China as it highlight the generous giving nature of committed Christians. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT August 8, 2012 at 3:08 am I hope through Chinese and the Korean evangelists,the neighboring countries could see the word of Gospel. September 25, 2013 at 4:57 pm I didnt claim that the Anglicans were the first to bring the Bible to CHina, it was the Jesuits.The Catholics have a lot of housecleaning to do, before they can hold themselves up as paragons of virtue. China is not going to let the Catholics run amuck with no oversight or control. Rector Washington, DC Rev Sandra McCann MD says: Jana Jennings says: March 14, 2012 at 8:12 pm Is there an opportunity to teach in seminaries in China?My grandparents were missionaries for 40 years. He was the first Bishop of Anking and she was a graduate of the Philadelphia School for Deaconesses after graduating from Northwestern. They were my role models.It would be wonderful to go there, though I understand the authorized church is controlled and there are underground churches. Nothing was mentioned of this.Peace,c March 14, 2012 at 10:10 pm It’s a bit presumptuous to claim that it was the Episcopalians who bought the bible to China, when Jesuits and Catholics settled not just Macao, but had the first westerners accepted as Emperor’s scholars with Matteu Ricci back in the 1500’s. While I enjoyed the commentary on the dance of the church’s with the Communist government, the article shows great respect to the Catholics who held to their belief throughout much oppression and still hold themselves independent of Communist control… something perhaps the Episcopalians should consider lest they be seen as lackeys of the government… oh… I forget. John McCann says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Hopkinsville, KY Comments are closed. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Jim Moore says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET By Lynette WilsonPosted Mar 14, 2012 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest March 17, 2012 at 11:23 am They don’t need a seminary-trained teacher, just give them Bibles and let God be their teacher.Jer 31:31 Behold, the days come, saith the LORD, that I will make a new covenant with the house of Israel, and with the house of Judah: …Jer 31:33 But this shall be the covenant that I will make with the house of Israel; After those days, saith the LORD, I will put my law in their inward parts, and write it in their hearts; and will be their God, and they shall be my people.Jer 31:34 And they shall teach no more every man his neighbour, and every man his brother, saying, Know the LORD: for they shall all know me, from the least of them unto the greatest of them, saith the LORD: for I will forgive their iniquity, and I will remember their sin no more.Heb 8:8 … Behold, the days come, saith the Lord, when I will make a new covenant with the house of Israel and with the house of Judah: …Heb 8:10 For this is the covenant that I will make with the house of Israel after those days, saith the Lord; I will put my laws into their mind, and write them in their hearts: and I will be to them a God, and they shall be to me a people:Heb 8:11 And they shall not teach every man his neighbour, and every man his brother, saying, Know the Lord: for all shall know me, from the least to the greatest. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Job Listingcenter_img Mamang Sitlhou says: Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Pittsburgh, PA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Laura Callender says: Press Release Service Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Comments (12) Paul Nelson says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Bruce Green says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Collierville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET March 26, 2012 at 12:27 pm How very ironic…the presiding officer of the Episcopal Church is welcome with open arms by the Chinese government and in the same month, they detain Coadjutor Bishop Peter Shao Zhumin of Wenzhou and his chancellor Father Paul Jiang Sunian for “learning classes.” Bishop John Wang Ruowang of Tianshui was detained for the same “remedial” education in January. Why? Because these good men are faithful, orthodox Catholics in union with the Sucessor of Peter and the Chinese refuse to recognize them as legitimately holding their offices.“If you were of the world, the world would love its own. Yet because you are not of the world, but I chose you out of the world, therefore the world hates you…. If they persecuted Me they will persecute you… for they do not know the One who sent Me.” John 15:19-21″Hmmmm… if I were Katherine, I’d be worried. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR March 15, 2012 at 1:16 pm I agree with Jim. Nothing mentioned here of the existence of christianity in China as early as the 5th Century. See a new book published this year by Daniel H Bays entitled a new History of Christianity in China which highlights the arrival of Christianity in China in the early centuries. That aside, the article above does highlight the good that faith in Christ is doing in the country. Submit a Press Release John McCann says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Events Rector Smithfield, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID March 19, 2012 at 7:35 pm I spent 2009/10 in Beijing as ESL facilitator, worshiping and helping with the English Fellowship service at Haidian Christian Church in the Haidian District. In China, worship and becoming a Christian is a privilege. Whereas in America where Christians take such a privilege for granted, at the Haidian church alone, people lined up around the block in all kinds of weather to wait for their chance to come into the church that seats about 1,500. There are three or four services every Sunday–and every one is packed full. March 14, 2012 at 8:40 pm See what Aspinwald started – and Boone. VTS strikes again. Associate Rector Columbus, GAlast_img read more

East Carolina diocese announces 4 nominees for bishop

first_img Bishop Elections Rector Washington, DC Tags An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab By diocesan staffPosted Feb 10, 2014 Rector Hopkinsville, KY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Press Release Service East Carolina diocese announces 4 nominees for bishop Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit a Job Listing Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Albany, NY center_img Submit a Press Release Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Shreveport, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Pittsburgh, PA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS [Episcopal Diocese of East Carolina] The Standing Committee of the Diocese of East Carolina announced its slate of nominees for election as bishop. The announcement was made as the final piece of business during the 131st Convention of the diocese on Feb. 8, meeting in New Bern, North Carolina.The nominees are:The Rev. Mary Cecilia (Mimi) Lacy, rector, St. Timothy’s Church, Greenville, North Carolina;The Rev. Canon David Pfaff, Canon to the Ordinary, Diocese of Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin;The Rev. Robert Skirving, rector, St. John’s Church, Midland, Michigan; andThe Rev. Stephen Smith, rector, St. Patrick’s Church, Dublin, Ohio.More information about each of the nominees is available here.A petition process for submitting additional names opened on Feb. 8 and will close on Feb. 22. Complete information about the petition process and the petition form are available on the website as well.The slate is the result of a 10-month discernment process conducted by the Search Committee, made up of lay and clergy members representing all five deaneries of the diocese. The Search Committee was established and charged by the Standing Committee. With the announcement of the slate, a Transition Committee, also reporting to the Standing Committee and comprising lay and clergy members from across the diocese, implements the next stages of the election process.The nominees will tour the diocese and participate in question-and-answer sessions April 28-May 2, giving the people of the diocese an opportunity to meet and learn more about the nominees. Visit http://eastcarolinabishopsearch.com/about/process.html for locations and times.The election will take place on Saturday, May 17 at Christ Church, New Bern, North Carolina. All canonically resident clergy of the diocese and lay delegates vote separately as “orders”; a majority of votes on the same ballot from both the clergy and lay orders is required for election.Pending consent from a majority of the Episcopal Church’s diocesan bishops and a majority of dioceses (via their Standing Committees), the consecration and ordination of the bishop-elect is scheduled to take place on Saturday, Nov. 8 at the Rock Springs Center in Greenville, North Carolina, with Presiding Bishop Jefferts Schori presiding.The Rt. Rev. Clifton Daniel served as the 7th bishop from 1997 until his resignation in February 2013 to become the bishop provisional of the Diocese of Pennsylvania. The Rt. Rev. Peter J. Lee was elected bishop provisional in March 2013 and will serve until the consecration of the 8th bishop. The Diocese of East Carolina is composed of nearly 70 parishes in 32 counties and covers the area from I-95 to the coast and from Southport up to Gatesville. This diocese is home to several major military bases, a large Hispanic community, and small congregations. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Bath, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Tampa, FL Submit an Event Listinglast_img read more

RIP: Deacon Terry Star, Executive Council member, found dead at…

first_img Keith Charles Edwards says: March 5, 2014 at 5:31 pm Terry, may you continue to blaze a trail of witness for us. I am here with grieving mothers, that cannot be changed, but we know you now know the deep abiding peace awaiting you. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC March 5, 2014 at 5:57 pm A sweet serious yet funny man. I love him. I miss him! March 6, 2014 at 11:35 am Rest in peace Uncle Terry , thanks for all the help and all the talks we had , I will miss you Rector Martinsville, VA Danny L Anderson JR says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Rev. Terry Star, a deacon in the Diocese of North Dakota and a member of the Episcopal Church’s Executive Council, has died at Nashotah House Theological Seminary in Wisconsin. Photo: Bishop Carol Gallagher via Facebook.[Episcopal News Service] The Rev. Terry Star, a 40 year-old deacon in the Diocese of North Dakota and a member of the Episcopal Church’s Executive Council, has died suddenly at Nashotah House Theological Seminary in Wisconsin, where he was studying for ordination to the priesthood.After Star did not attend chapel the morning of March 4 and failed to show up for classes or meals a member of the Nashotah House community went to check on him and found he had died, according to the Rev. Canon John Floberg, a fellow member of the Diocese of North Dakota and also an Executive Council member, and the Rev. Phillip Cunningham, Nashotah House associate dean of administration.Floberg told Episcopal News Service that there was no indication Star was ill. “It took everybody by surprise,” he said.Star, whose council term would have ended after General Convention in 2015, was also a convention deputy. He belonged to the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and considered St. James Episcopal Church in Cannon Ball, North Dakota, to be his home church. He served as a deacon for the Standing Rock Episcopal Community.Star had been a youth minister on the reservation for many years. When Episcopal News Service reached Floberg on March 5, he was en route to the reservation high schools to talk with students who knew Star. Floberg reported that the principal of the high school in Fort Yates, North Dakota, had asked him to come in as a counselor after word was received of Star’s death. Floberg said he also planned to go to the high school in Solen, North Dakota, “because they’re in the same place” about Star’s death.In November, Star preached at the consecration of the new St. James building which replaced the church that was destroyed by an arsonist in July 2012. A video recording of his sermon is here.Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori said in a statement that “the Episcopal Church has been much blessed by the ministry of Deacon Terry Star, on Standing Rock, as a member of Executive Council, and through the many relationships he had built throughout the church and beyond.”“We give thanks for his life and witness, his prophetic voice, and his reconciling heart. All his relatives are grieving, and we pray that his soul may rest in peace and his spirit continue to prod us all in continuing the ministry of healing we have from Jesus.”The Rev. Gay Clark Jennings, House of Deputies president and vice chair of Executive Council, called Star “a dedicated and passionate deputy from the Diocese of North Dakota and member of Executive Council, a fierce advocate for the people of his beloved Standing Rock, and a loyal and faithful Episcopalian.”“He was also smart, witty, and a good pastor and friend. His death is an enormous loss for his family, the Cannon Ball community, the Episcopal Church, and all of us who served with him,” she added.Reaction to his death and tributes to his life soon began to appear on Facebook.“Deacon Terry Star was a holy witness to the lived gospel – I am so sorry to hear the news of his death,” Diocese of Long Island Bishop Larry Provenzano said in reaction to Diocese of North Dakota Assisting Bishop Carol Gallagher’s posting of the news on her Facebook page. “May he rest in the loving arms of Jesus, whom he served so well.”The Rev. Jennifer Phillips, of St. Francis Episcopal Church in Rio Rancho, New Mexico, said “May he feast with the ancestors!”Star’s own Facebook page is now filled with messages and tributes.“Oh my friend, I know you are where your light will continue to shine and we will always feel your support and love,” wrote Janet A. Routzen from Mission, South Dakota. “Praying for your family….”BobbiBrandon Bear Heels wrote “RIP my sundance brother we shall see each other again…look down on us from time to time from the heavens my brother. will miss seeing you every year at Mato Woapiya sundance.”Fellow Executive Council member John B. Johnson wrote on Star’s page that he was “deeply saddened to learn this news.”“Terry was literally a rising star in the Episcopal Church. I will miss him terribly on Executive Council of the Episcopal Church. My heart goes out to all of his friends, classmates and family. May he rest in peace.”It would appear that Star last posted on his page at 10:35 a.m. on March 3 and he last tweeted on his account at 1:46 a.m. on March 4 when he was listening to Bob Dylan’s “Like a Rolling Stone” on Spotify.Star was prayed for at the Chapel of Christ the Lord at the Episcopal Church Center in New York on Ash Wednesday morning “for his journey to the spirit world and for comfort to his mother Charlotte Star in her time of grief,” according to Sarah Eagle Heart, missioner for indigenous ministries.Eagle Heart said a group involved in native youth ministry that was meeting at the church center “will continue this work in his memory.”Star, a member of council’s Joint Standing Committee on Local Ministry and Mission, was an advocate for people marginalized by society, especially native peoples.At the most recent council meeting, Star helped lead an effort that resulted in the council joining what has become a nationwide effort that has reached to the White House to convince the National Football League’s Washington Redskins team to change its name.“I’ve been fighting with this issue since I was in high school 22 years ago,” he said at the time.Star was born in Seattle, Washington. He lived on 10 Indian reservations, in part because of his father’s career in tribal law enforcement, according to information on Star’s LinkedIn page.Lillian Ironbull-Martinez, his maternal grandmother, raised him in the Episcopal Church and, according to his LinkedIn biography, he and other members of the Standing Rock Episcopal Community liked to joke that they are “cradle-board Episcopalians.”When Star was confirmed at Our Father’s House/St. Michael’s Mission in Ethete, Wyoming, his grandmother predicted that someday he would be ordained in the Episcopal Church. Star was ordained into the diaconate in June 2007.He is survived by his parents Charlotte and Woodrow Star of Pendleton, Oregon; his brothers and sisters and “many relatives and friends,” according to Diocese of North Dakota Bishop Michael Smith.Funeral service arrangements have not yet been announced, but Floberg said they will take place on the Standing Rock reservation. He said Star’s parents were en route to the reservation on March 5.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Betty J Dwarf says: martha knight says: Dianne Aid says: March 6, 2014 at 3:59 am May his memory be eternal, and may his parents, family and friends be comforted. Deepest sympathy. Pickett Wall says: Michael Alphin says: Executive Council, Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT People Submit an Event Listing March 5, 2014 at 7:01 pm RIP Terry, you will be missed by all, including the youth of Standing Rock whom you have done so much for. God has gained an Angel. I believe Terry is sitting with our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. This news of his loss is like nothing we will never understand. He worked to help the people of Standing Rock, but The Lord had other plans for Mr. Terry Star. You will be missed by many who lives and heart that you touched. God Bless his family and Friends. To Brandon & AngelaMaui may The Lord comfort you. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID March 6, 2014 at 6:44 pm I did not know the man, but I feel an akin to him an all who loved him. I pray that he did not suffer. March 6, 2014 at 3:28 am May the peace and comfort that only God can provide surround those who knew and loved you best! March 5, 2014 at 5:12 pm This is so sad. May he rest in peace and rise in glory. Davey Joseph says: March 6, 2014 at 12:03 pm Terry the peace-maker, Terry the humourist, Terry with the strength of lions has been a gift to us. Let us rejoice in the lasting effects of that gift even as we mourn Terry’s death, and let us commit him to God’s gracious keeping until the last day. RIP: Deacon Terry Star, Executive Council member, found dead at seminary March 5, 2014 at 8:01 pm Please accept my sympathies at the loss of such a good and important man. His service in the human and spiritual lives of those he knew will live on. I pray peace for all whose heart he filled. James Cowan says: March 6, 2014 at 12:20 am I miss you uncle Terry.. I need you back.. We all need You Back. You Made Us All Smile. Your smile Was Always The Biggest and brightest. I Love You Ate And I always will Have You In My Heart. We All Will. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab March 6, 2014 at 2:28 pm I am the resurrection and the life, saith the Lord: he that believeth in me, though he were dead, yet shall he live: and whosoever liveth and believeth in me shall never die.I know that my Redeemer liveth, and that he shall stand at the latter day upon the earth. And though after my skin worms destroy this body, yet in my flesh shall I see God: whom I shall see for myself, and mine eyes shall behold, and not another.We brought nothing into this world, and it is certain we can carry nothing out. The Lord gave, and the Lord hath taken away; blessed be the Name of the Lord.Man that is born of a woman hath but a short time to live, and is full of misery. He cometh up, and is cut down, like a flower; he fleeth as it were a shadow, and never continueth in one stay.In the midst of life we are in death: of whom may we seek for succour, but of thee, O Lord, who for our sins art justly displeased? Yet, O Lord God most holy, O Lord most mighty, O holy and most merciful Saviour, deliver us not into the bitter pains of eternal death.Thou knowest, Lord, the secrets of our hearts; shut not thy merciful ears to our prayer; but spare us, Lord most holy, O God most mighty, O holy and merciful Saviour, thou most worthy judge eternal, suffer us not, at our last hour, for any pains of death, to fall from thee.I heard a voice from heaven, saying unto me, Write, From henceforth blessed are the dead which die in the Lord: even so saith the Spirit: for they rest from their labours. Janice Meisner says: Rector Tampa, FL Comments navigation Newer comments March 6, 2014 at 6:47 pm 4th sentence is my favorite. Stephanie Roubideaux Mosley says: Obituary, Vicky Star says: March 6, 2014 at 10:08 am The St. John’s Northwestern community is grateful for Terry’s service and dedication. His presence here on campus was a blessing. May our dear friend and brother rest in peace and rise in glory. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group March 6, 2014 at 11:13 am my deepest sympathy to woody and charlotte, and the rest of the family, he will be missed. Rector Collierville, TN March 6, 2014 at 9:58 pm Such a gentle man, with a warm, infectious smile. He was a friend to all he met, I am sure, and will be truly missed by all for a long,, long time. To me, he was a very gentle giant of a man, with not a mean bone in his body, and I am truly grateful that our paths crossed. Peace be with you, Terry. Director of Music Morristown, NJ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ March 5, 2014 at 9:57 pm RIP my dear classmate…I know you are watching over us as an Angel <3 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York rochelle rodriguez says: Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET March 6, 2014 at 4:12 pm It is sad that we have lost such a valued member of our church. May his life be a guiding light to all of the Diocese of North Dakota. Although I did not know him well personally, I had contact with him at various retreats and meetings. My prayers go out to his family and community. He is now living in peace with the Lord. Terry’s life is a tremendous inspiration to me as I continue my studies to be a deacon. Margaret Brack says: March 5, 2014 at 6:05 pm R.i.p terry i still can’t believe your gone ima miss you alot wish i could of seen you one last time your an angel now watch inng over your friends and family Patti Bush says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA Tags Rector Belleville, IL center_img In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Jobs & Calls Featured Events This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Cynthia Bear Robe-Jones says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Mar 5, 2014 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Edward Wos says: Lynne Colombe says: Cn. Shirley M. Watts says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Shreveport, LA Press Release Service March 7, 2014 at 11:05 am Heavenly Father we know another angel by name ; Terry Star whom is in heaven now . Please grant all spiritual Family and all whom knew Terry Star strength and continue to hear and know God love and bring forth goodness and helping all in knowing and having God in our Life . Thank You God for letting us know a Angel here on Earth. family of Terry Star you are in our prayer’s. Submit a Job Listing The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate Diocese of Nebraska Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem March 6, 2014 at 12:01 pm RIP Terry Starr….you were an inspiration to all of the kids and parents of Cannon Ball…you had a smile for everyone when you saw them…You will be missed in Cannon Ball Community….:) Rector Bath, NC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY March 6, 2014 at 12:47 am I am shocked and saddened at the news of Terry`s death. We worked together in domestic and foreign mission programs several years ago. His passion for mission, his dedication to the Episcopal Church, and his perseverance in following the call to ordained ministry will be remembered. Condolences to his family, his friends, and his companions in Christ. Sincerely,Cn. Shirley M. WattsVFM (Ret.)Canon for Mission & Outreach (Ret.)Episcopal Diocese of WNY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Keith Charles Edwards says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME March 5, 2014 at 9:39 pm Terry was a great friend to many of us here on the Rosebud Sioux Indian Reservation as well. He will be missed by many, especially myself and the rest of our classmates from Todd County High School. There are few people on this earth who can leave on their journey to the Spirit World who exit without a single bad thing to be said about them… Terry is one of these people. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR March 6, 2014 at 1:43 am My condolences to Woody & Charlotte Starr, Terry was such a good happy going young man he always had words of encouragement an comfort if u were down an out an always uplifted ur spirits wen needed, happy journeys to u my friend an I know u will be watching down on us with that big happy smile u always had, rest easy till we meet again. <3 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Ann Fontaine says: Comments are closed. March 5, 2014 at 3:14 pm Like a shooting star leaving tracks on our hearts. Rise in glory, brother. Margaret Fasthorse-DeCora says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Albany, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Comments navigation Newer comments Submit a Press Release Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Sandra t. Montes says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Comments (31) Rector Knoxville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL March 5, 2014 at 10:34 pm What a guiding light you have been to us all! You will continue to shine in our hearts. May we be bold enough to continue the many causes you supported! We will miss you at Nashotah and here at the diocese in ND. Your presence will be remembered always. Rest in peace. Cruzito alderete says: Tery & Curt Olson says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET rhonda moore says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AKlast_img

Richard Bass joins Church Publishing as consulting editor

first_imgRichard Bass joins Church Publishing as consulting editor Youth Minister Lorton, VA Posted Jun 17, 2014 Rector Martinsville, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Press Release Rector Hopkinsville, KY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI [Church Publishing press release] Nationally recognized congregational development expert and former publisher of the Alban Institute Richard Bass has joined Church Publishing Incorporated (CPI) as a consulting editor, specializing in congregational development, church leadership, and the challenges and opportunities facing congregations today.Bass served as Director of Publishing at Alban from 2002 until earlier this year. Prior to becoming Director of Publishing, he directed the development of the Congregational Resource Guide, a joint project of the Alban Institute and the Indianapolis Center for Congregations. He also worked for the reference publisher ABC-CLIO, the United States Catholic Conference, and the Practising Law Institute.“Church Publishing is proud to be ‘the place where the conversations happen’ both within The Episcopal Church and ecumenically. Richard’s presence on our team strengthens and broadens our ability to live into that commitment,” said Nancy Bryan, CPI’s Editorial Director.Mr. Bass remarked: “I am really looking forward to working with the fine team at Church Publishing. Nancy Bryan and Davis Perkins have pulled together a strong collection of editors producing resources and working on many of the most pressing issues facing congregations and the church today. I am grateful to be part of such an effort.”Bass holds a bachelor’s degree in American Studies from Wesleyan University, Connecticut. He lives in Alexandria, Virginia, with his wife, Diana Butler Bass, and their daughter. They attend St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Alexandria.  Mr. Bass can be reached at [email protected] In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Shreveport, LA People Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Job Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL center_img Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Press Release Service An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit an Event Listing Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Tags Rector Tampa, FL Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Albany, NY Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Collierville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Events Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Bath, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA last_img read more

Video: Love in a Box brings Christmas joy to Europe’s…

first_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC By Matthew DaviesPosted Dec 22, 2014 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Press Release Service Comments (5) Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET [Episcopal News Service] For many orphans and disadvantaged children throughout Europe, being able to open a gift on Christmas Day is merely a dream.Love in a Box, a ministry of the American Cathedral in Paris, is committed to changing that reality. For more than a decade, the ministry has helped to put a smile on the faces of children who often have very little to smile about.In the weeks leading up to Christmas, several packing shifts are organized by coordinators Judy Nicault and Betsi Dwyer with Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, and volunteers from local schools loading boxes and backpacks with practical gifts, a few fun items, and some candy. This year, the final count of 3,218 boxes and backpacks is a record.Didier Chastagnier from The Salvation Army drives the 12-hour round trip from Strasbourg to Paris and parks his van outside the American Cathedral on the first Sunday in Advent.At the end of the service the choir and congregation take the boxes and process out of the cathedral to Chastagnier’s van where the gifts are loaded ready for distribution to European countries such as Bulgaria, Croatia, and Bosnia and Herzegovina.— Matthew Davies is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Karen Birr says: Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC December 22, 2014 at 5:57 pm What a wonderful ministry. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL December 23, 2014 at 12:55 pm Operation Christmas Shoe Box has been going on for years also. This ministry is from the Rev. Franklin Graham. My home parish has been participating in this ministry for years. They sound similar. Both are good ministries and shows God’s love. Comments are closed. December 22, 2014 at 1:06 pm I participated in this program while i was in Paris in the late 1990s and early 2000s. for a couple of years, I helped pack the boxes. But one year was my favorite. I had a job singing at Disneyland Paris, and as an employee, I got a huge discount at the company store. I bought about 100 euros of adorable small toys at around .10 each and brought them in an enormous sack to the Cathedral to add to the boxes. I felt like Santa that year! It is a wonderful program. December 2, 2015 at 8:57 pm Grahmn’s ministry, which is, I must admit a good one, despite the fact that I disagree with the man’s politics, is focused on helping children in foreign countries. This mission is a domestic one- the box that is to say that it takes place within the EU- indeed, most of the boxes stay in Paris. Rector Shreveport, LA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest martha knight says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group martha knight says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Martinsville, VA Video In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Rector Columbus, GA Video: Love in a Box brings Christmas joy to Europe’s children in need Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Press Release Rector Belleville, IL Featured Events Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Tags Rector Collierville, TN Rector Washington, DC Lisa Rothstein Benson says: Rector Tampa, FL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Smithfield, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Bath, NC Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs December 22, 2014 at 5:58 pm This ministry is so exciting. So glad to see such positive ministries. Whit Johnstone says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AKlast_img read more

California: Grace Cathedral’s history told through new app-based audio tour

first_img Rector Smithfield, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Knoxville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Press Release Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Music Morristown, NJ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit an Event Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Shreveport, LA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Press Release Service [Grace Cathedral press release] Grace Cathedral, one of San Francisco’s most historic and iconic buildings that attracts more than half a million visitors each year, has announced the debut of GraceGuide, its first foray into the world of apps.GraceGuide is a set of app-based audio tours for both adults and families. Produced by Antenna, one of the world’s leading designers of digital content and mobile experiences for cultural and historic institutions, GraceGuide brings to life the cathedral’s fascinating history, from the Great Earthquake of 1906 to the tremors wrought by struggles for labor, civil and gender rights and the AIDS crisis. The app combines storytelling, music and images.“This app-based audio tour gives visitors a new, multi-layered way to experience the cathedral, whether they are visiting in person or exploring from home,” said the Rev. Malcolm Clemens Young, dean of the cathedral. “GraceGuide takes visitors on a journey that can be entertaining, educational, artistic, spiritual or reflective, depending on which tour is chosen. We commissioned this app so that the thousands of people who visit every week from the city, the Bay Area and all over the world will feel even more at home at Grace Cathedral and find it even easier to explore, discover and experience. We especially wanted a children- and family-focused component.”The GraceGuide app features a 30-minute “Highlights” tour for adults, showcasing historical photos, revealing maps, and the cathedral’s neo-Gothic architecture. Other selections are a special welcome to the cathedral by the Bishop of California Marc Handley Andrus, and music for reflection.GraceGuide also offers “Cathedral Quest,” a 30-minute scavenger hunt for kids and families. Young visitors are given a series of clues to find 10 secret treasures in the cathedral.  For example, the Quest encourages kids to dip their fingers in the water of the baptismal font and to find and open the secret compartment concealed in one of the cathedral’s antique chairs.“GraceGuide is intended to enhance the visitor experience by making the cathedral’s story even more memorable and engaging,” said Christine Murray, senior content designer for Antenna. “The beauty of this audio content is that it’s powerfully diverse.  We’ve intertwined sound and touch to build mental imagery and a fun ‘eyes-up’ experience for kids. And for the visitor looking for a more serene experience, there’s reflective music that they can access to simply ponder the beauty of the architecture.”“Antenna staff really immersed themselves in our mission, identity and history to create the app,” Katherine Thompson, canon director of development said.  “Antenna has unmatched experience and expertise and we consider them a wonderful partner.”The GraceGuide app is free to download and is currently available for both iOS and Android devices. Rector Bath, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Job Listing California: Grace Cathedral’s history told through new app-based audio tour Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Martinsville, VA Featured Events Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Belleville, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Tampa, FL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Posted Aug 10, 2016 Youth Minister Lorton, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Albany, NYlast_img read more

Colorado Bishop Robert O’Neill on the shooting in Las Vegas

first_img Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Advocacy Peace & Justice, Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET On Oct. 3, the solitary great bell of Saint John’s Cathedral tolled 59 times — once for each of the individuals killed this week in the tragic mass shooting in Las Vegas.The tolling of our cathedral’s great bell was not an act undertaken in isolation but rather one of solidarity—a response to the call of Bishops United Against Gun Violence to mourn collectively and for all of us across the country to name our grief over the deaths of so many killed so senselessly.There is plenty for all of us to mourn. By some counts over 1,500 mass shootings have taken place since the shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary in December 2012. That’s nearly one mass shooting a day in this country in the last five years. While the shootings in Las Vegas this week are a tragedy, they are, even more tragically, yet another sad marker of a violent trajectory that will continue to bear us all along its destructive path unless we together respond mindfully and courageously.As a member of Bishops United Against Gun Violence, I invite you to read the statement we issued on Monday, and I encourage you to pass it along to others. I have been a member of this group of some 70 Episcopal bishops since its inception, and I stand with them in this call to the church:Bishops United Against Gun Violence Statement >There is no question that we who follow Jesus are called to pray for the victims of the violence in Las Vegas — for those who were killed, for those who were wounded, for the families of victims, for first responders, and for the medical personnel who are caring for the wounded and injured. They need us to bear them in our hearts with love.But there is more.Our prayer, too, needs to be one of courageous self-examination. We will never become mature, well-integrated disciples of Jesus unless we look inward, prayerfully inviting God to illumine our own hearts and to reveal to us the ways in which we ourselves are complicit—either actively or passively, through our avoidance or complacency—in the unconscionable violence of our culture. We need the Holy Spirit to awaken our hearts and to stir us out of our own listlessness.And there is still more.Like the disciples on the day of Pentecost, we all have a responsibility as followers of Jesus to ask the question “What does this mean?” To be obedient to Jesus is to listen attentively and to respond actively to the unsettling movement of the Spirit, to consider honestly and openly how God is actually speaking to us through the events of our world and what God might actually be calling us to do. That’s what it means to be a disciple — to follow Jesus, to walk in love as Christ loves us, to act, to allow the Holy Spirit to transform our own indifference or confusion or pain or grief in such a way that we become those who actively bear witness to the life-giving and liberating love that we intend to proclaim. Our world needs our faithful, courageous, and active witness against the violence that so haunts us all.While tragic events like the shootings in Las Vegas this week are cause to mourn, they should also be occasions that jar us, God willing, into a certain moral, emotional, and spiritual clarity that reveals to us the work we have to do, must do, as people of God. We simply do not have the luxury to remain silent or passive. We need to name our grief, to be sure, and we need mourn with those who weep. But as Rohr has written, “If we do not transform our pain, we will most assuredly transmit it.”— The Rt. Rev. Robert O’Neill, The Episcopal Church of Colorado New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Belleville, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit an Event Listing Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab [Episcopal Church in Colorado] “If we do not transform our pain, we will most assuredly transmit it.” -Richard Rohr Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Colorado Bishop Robert O’Neill on the shooting in Las Vegas Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Albany, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Gun Violence, Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Job Listing Featured Events Posted Oct 5, 2017 Rector Tampa, FL center_img Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Knoxville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Pittsburgh, PA Tags This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Press Release Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Press Release Service Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Las Vegas shooting Associate Rector Columbus, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group last_img read more