The whole-atmosphere response to changes in the Earth’s magnetic field from 1900 to 2000: an example of “top-down” vertical coupling

first_imgWe study the effects of changes in the Earth’s magnetic field between 1900 and 2000 on the whole atmosphere (0–500 km altitude), based on simulations with the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model eXtension. Magnetic field changes directly affect the temperature and wind in the upper atmosphere (> ~110 km) via Joule heating and the ion drag force. However, we also find significant responses in zonal mean temperature and zonal wind in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) middle- to high-latitude troposphere, stratosphere, and mesosphere of up to ±2 K and ±2 m/s, as well as regionally significant changes in Northern Hemisphere (NH) polar surface temperatures of up to ±1.3 K, in December-January-February. In the SH, changes in gravity wave filtering in the thermosphere induce a change in the residual circulation that extends down into the upper mesosphere, where further changes in the mean wind climatology are generated, together with changes in local planetary wave generation and/or amplification and gravity wave filtering. This induces further changes to a residual circulation cell extending down into the troposphere. However, inaccuracies in the simulated SH upper mesospheric wind climatology probably mean that the simulated temperature and wind responses in the SH lower and middle atmosphere are also inaccurate. The NH middle atmosphere response is zonally asymmetric, consisting of a significant change in the positioning and shape of the upper stratospheric polar vortex, which is dynamically consistent with the surface temperature response. However, the downward coupling mechanism in the NH is generally less clearlast_img read more

Premier Moves Management Ltd expelled from TPO

first_imgHome » News » Premier Moves Management Ltd expelled from TPO  previous nextRegulation & LawPremier Moves Management Ltd expelled from TPO A sales and lettings agent in South West London has been expelled from The Property Ombudsman (TPO) scheme.Sheila Manchester23rd August 20172 Comments2,649 Views A sales and lettings agent in South West London has been expelled from The Property Ombudsman (TPO) scheme for a year after the Ombudsman supported a landlord complaint. Premier Moves Management Limited (PMM) did not pay the award of £4,900 as instructed by the Ombudsman so the case was referred to TPO’s Disciplinary & Standards Committee, which ruled the firm should be expelled from TPO.  Consumers are being warned that the firm might be trading illegally* as its website is still live with both ‘For Sale’ and ‘To Let’ properties, even though the office is shut and the agent does not appear to be registered with Rightmove or Zoopla. Complaint summaryThe complainants said they received a poor service from PMM with ‘promises made and not kept’ and poor communication, with PMM not being contactable during office hours. The specific complaints were that PMM failed to:Pay over rental money receivedAdvise about Council Tax and whether it should have been accounted for in the rentConfirm whether a deposit was taken, the amount and where it was registeredEffectively manage the property, citing a lack of copy tenancy agreements, updates about renewed tenancy agreements and make regular inspectionAdvise the complainants about changes to lettings of which PMM were aware Ombudsman decision The Ombudsman investigated each issue and upheld the complaints. PMM had already agreed it owed £3,600 in rent received. The Ombudsman directed PMM to transfer all rent monies by then owed to the Complainants (£4,350). In addition to this, a £500 award of compensation was made. The total award was £4,900.Katrine Sporle (pictured), Property Ombudsman, said,“My investigation found the agent had failed to ensure rent was passed on to the complainants (landlords) promptly and considered this caused the complainants aggravation, distress and inconvenience. The agent agreed, in writing, that the amount owed to the complainants would be fully paid to them in 28 days but the agent failed to make any payment so the case was referred to the DSC.”DSC findings and rulingAll members of TPO are obliged to comply with awards made by the Ombudsman and are also obliged to co-operate with investigations. Premier Moves Management Limited also voluntarily agreed to abide by the Code. PMM did make an offer to pay by instalments following the Ombudsman’s decision but this was refused by the complainants. However, no further offer or any payment on account was made after that.The DSC therefore considered this a serious and flagrant breach of Premier Moves Management Limited’s obligations under the Membership Deed.  In view of that, the DSC concluded that Premier Moves Management Limited should be expelled and excluded from membership of TPO and from registration for redress for one year.Premier Moves Management Limited will, for that period, no longer be registered with TPO for lettings redress as required by the Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Act 2013 and could not operate as a sales agent because redress registration is also required by Section 23A of the Estate Agents Act 1979. Gerry Fitzjohn, Chairman of TPO’s Board, said, “We set high standards for agents – the scheme’s approved Code of Practice goes above and beyond the letter of the law, requiring agents to offer additional safeguards to protect consumers. This firm will longer be able to trade as a result of this expulsion and we urge any consumers that suspect the firm is trading to contact Trading Standards who have been notified of PMM’s expulsion.”  Katrine Sporle Premier Moves Management The Propety Ombudsman Scheme TPO expels agent August 23, 2017Sheila Manchester2 commentsNicholas Foster, Nicholas Foster Nicholas Foster 28th January 2019 at 4:26 pmHi Mr Farooq Ahmad, Madlondon, MadlondonIt appears the same has happened to me, December 2018Please contact me if you are willing to give me some details to support a case to encourage the Crown Prosecution Service or Police fraud Squad getting involvedThank,NickLog in to ReplyFarooq Ahmad, Madlondon Madlondon 13th November 2017 at 6:32 pmI contacted TPO at least a year before the dates listed in this article.This fraudster did exactly the same to myself and brother, months of lies and broken promises to pay. We eventually closed the doors on his shop, he left owning us thousands in unpaid and collected rent. This wasn’t the end of it as all the tenants he found for us didn’t get a penny of their deposit back, leaving us liable.The TPO have no teeth, their slow and lengthy complaints process gives criminally intent estate agents more time to defraud others.What makes me laugh is that TPO know his website is still live and hat he has a new business address but CANT do anything to stop him.Log in to ReplyWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021last_img read more

COMMUNITY AND BUSINESS LEADER AMY RIVERS-WORD SPEAKS OUT

first_imgCOMMUNITY AND BUSINESS LEADER AMY RIVERS-WORD  SPEAKS OUT ABOUT DECISION OF ZONING APPEALS BOARDI have seen a lot of political hackery in my day in Evansville, but I think tonight took the cake.Fellow business owners Kerry KC Chesser and Chad Brady were denied their parking variance this evening, with a vote of 4-3 with the Area Zoning Appeals Board this evening. This post will be a bit wordy, as there is so much to discuss from tonight, but it is worth it to get to the end.The first and most important piece of evidence that was brought before the board from their attorney, was the current businesses on Franklin Street that have been given parking variances over the past years, MOST within the past 5 years. The power point presentation showed the multiple places, including the ONLY business remonstrator on the street, that have parking variances, the number of spots they DO have, and the number of spots they asked for and were granted in their variance. Just this past year, several places were given 100% (yes, literally no parking spaces) variances. One is the newest pizza place to open on the street just within the past year. Required spots 21 = required ZERO by the board!! The new development from KC and Chad, was going to have 93 total spots, with a request of relaxing the ordinance by 25 spots. They would have had the largest, single parking lot on the street, even larger than the West Side Nut Club spots, that multiple businesses on the street are allowed to use to meet the parking requirements. The precedent that has been set it STAGGERING, and the city attorney would have to do a double take, as KC and Chad are discussing possible litigation due to the disgusting political based decisions that were made this evening. In fact, one board member literally asked the question of how much precedence matters, because it is so overwhelmingly an important piece to tonight’s issue.Second, the blatant unprofessionalism shown to me by one of the board members, and witnessed by a room full of people, is appalling. Mr. Jonathan Parkhurst yelled at me, with pointed fingers, to go to the mic at one point. Even several members of the media asked me afterwards if I had any previous dealings with this member of the board. To my knowledge, I don’t know him, and only during my variance request, have I ever met the gentleman of the board. At least 10 people from the general public who were in attendance commented to me afterwards the open aggression that was shown to me by this board member.Third, to speak before the board you are sworn in. This in and of itself, is to take at FACE value comments made by those in attendance are truthful, accurate, and to the best of their knowledge. Board member Ms. Becky Kasha had asked if Franklin Street was doing anything to help with a perceived parking issue (which the vast majority down there, and who were also in attendance tonight, and who are the actual owners down there, DON’T EVEN SAY THERE IS ONE!) and I am privy to some information of something the Franklin Street Events Association is working on to try to stymy all future parking problems. We are meeting in 11 days with a local high school booster that rents from INDOT a large parking lot, very close to Franklin Street. We’d love to continue the growth on our street, provide safe and reliable parking, and a certain we will be able to work an agreement out to make this work. INDOT has ZERO plans for an interchange here, as our own mayor has given his approval of a plan for a play ground, Stop Light City Playground, the large park we had to make sure that INDOT had no plans to ever make into a clover leaf. I was told that my testimony to any of this, should not be included, by member Ms. Joy Payne, as how did we not know it was all going to be a clover leaf. As the president and founder of one of the most active city organizations, and the person who has lead the charge to vast growth on Franklin Street, I would assume my sworn testament IS acceptable, and again, was blatant unprofessionalism on the part of said member. Ultimately, it did not meet the agenda for an outcome that some members had already decided. I also had to laugh, and this is an aside, this board member on her personal Facebook page has a picture of her on Franklin Street, for TODAY Halloween on Franklin, Fall Bazaar, and Zombie Pub Crawl ~ Franklin Street, where nearly 8,000 visitors were present, and somehow she found a parking space.Fourth, the major neighorhood remonstrators, the Lamasco neighborhood association, a big piece that need to be listened to in this entire process, spoke that their opposition went from violently opposed at the beginning of this process last June, to NO OPINION on the project at this point. This means nearly all businesses on the street were for, the neighborhood had no opinion, and nearly the entire room were there in support of the project.Fifth, which is HUGE in my opinion, is the parking ordinance overlay (essentially waiting the ordinances) for Haynie’s Corner Arts District, Jacobsville Join In, and Evansville Downtown Alliance Main Street. These four areas, ALONG WITH FRANKLIN STREET, were brought to the city council approximately two years ago, to WAIVE the current parking ordinances in these districts, as our current ordinances are a detriment to continued development. To put this in very simple terms, my goergeous development, The Dapper Pig, literally required ZERO spots to open. Franklin Street, on the night of the vote, was pulled off, by a now gone city councilman. This is a big piece, as some of the arguments made by dissenting board members, is that NOW, all of sudden, Franklin Street has met some maximum capacity and no variances should be made going forward. YET, we have three large areas of our city that ZERO parking is required, but they haven’t met some magical capacity of parking? TENS OF THOUSANDS of people can find parking for the Fall Festival and FSEA events, but 25 spots that KC is asking for are not there?I am disappointed for Evansville. I am disappointed a building owner, who has done everything to satisfy a board and asked to simply be treated as the rest of the street has, CAN’T SPEND $1.5M OF THEIR MONEY TO DEVELOP A VACANT EYE SORE, under the guise of a nonexistent parking problem, that is currently trying to be fixed with a long term solution, and a property that would have had the largest lot on the street.All I can take away from this, is my adamant swearing up and down I would never run for public office is quickly becoming a thing of the past. STOP STIFFLING DEVELOPMENT. FIX OUR ANTIQUATED ORDINANCES. DEMAND MORE OF OUR PUBLIC OFFICIALS, ELECTED AND APPOINTMENT. GET INVOLVED IN THE PROCESS. SPEAK UP AND BE A PART OF THE CHANGE YOU WANT TO SEE. You deserve better, I deserve better, and Evansville deserves better.EDITORS FOOTNOTE: This e-mail was posted by AMY WORD-SMITH on area social media right after she attended the Zoning Appears Board hearing concerning Kerry Chessers request to locate  a new Restaurant-Bar on West Franklin Street.  We were asked to post this e-mail on the CCO.  We agreed to post it without editing.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

In Short

first_imgFinsbury cakes fallSales of celebration cakes continued to fall at Finsbury Food Group as consumers opted to trade down. Group revenue fell 4.1% to £168.3m for the financial year to 30 June 2010, while sales in its cake division were down 9.7% on the previous year. However, its bread and free-from division saw sales growth of 9.3%.RGFC’s mixed bagThe Real Good Food Company bakery ingredients business Renshaw has seen continued growth, with sales up 14% year-on-year, reported the firm. Its Hayden’s Bakeries business saw overall sales up 20%, for the six months to 30 June 2010, but turnover at its sugar firm Napier Brown was affected by lower market prices for sugar.Success for Lees Lees Foods has achieved record sales in its Lees of Scotland and The Waverley Bakery firms, for the six months to June 2010. In its latest trading update, the firm revealed group sales were up 9%, to £9.62m. It expected pre-tax profits for the first half of 2010 to be well ahead of last year’s figure of £394,000.Leaseholds for sale Acting on behalf of private owners, Christie + Co is offering for sale the leasehold interests of two Mangetout sandwich bars in Liverpool, which have a combined asking price of £200,000. They are located on Old Hall Street and Castle Street, near the new Liverpool 1 Shopping Centre.Food price inflation Food price inflation rose to 2.5% in July, compared with 1.7% in June. The British Retail Consortium said the increase was driven by global factors, including production problems in large wheat-exporting countries, such as Russia and Canada, putting pressure on the cost of fresh food.last_img read more

Anderson .Paak Appears On ‘CBS This Morning’, Performs Music From ‘ Ventura’, ‘Oxnard’ [Watch]

first_imgAnderson .Paak was the featured musical guest on Saturday morning’s episode of CBS This Morning. For their taped performance on the show’s “Saturday Sessions” series, the rising artist and his band performed a trio of songs from his Oxnard (2018) and Ventura (2019) studio albums.Related: Flying Lotus And Anderson .Paak Get Animated In Sci-Fi-Themed Video For “More”.Paak started the three-song performance with “Make It Better“, a soulful and relaxed tune from Ventura which originally featured Smokey Robinson appearing as a guest vocalist. There was no Robinson to help with the song’s vocals this time around, but .Paak was able to take on sole frontman duties to deliver a smooth performance. Paak then found himself back behind his drumkit–sunglasses and all–to take the band into a livelier direction with the performance of “King James”, another tune off of Ventura. The third and final song saw the band performing one of Paak’s songs off of Oxnard in the radio-friendly “Tints“.Watch all three performances from Saturday’s episode of CBS This Morning Below.Anderson .Paak – “Make It Better” – CBS This Morning[Video: CBS This Morning]Anderson .Paak – “King James” – CBS This Morning[Video: CBS This Morning]Anderson .Paak – “Tints” – CBS This Morning[Video: CBS This Morning]Saturday’s episode also featured an interview segment with Paak and CBS This Morning anchor Anthony Mason. The two touched on a range of subjects including the influences each member of Paak’s family had on him growing up in a house full of women, and the lack of his father’s presence in his life. Watch the interview segment below.Anderson .Paak – CBS This Morning[Video: CBS This Morning].Paak’s 2019 spring/summer tour continues throughout the holiday weekend with a scheduled performance at the Maine Savings Pavilion in Westbrook, ME on Sunday. Head to .Paak’s website for ticketing and more information.last_img read more

Arizona shooting spree casts light on gun violence in U.S.

first_imgAmong the many issues raised by the Tucson, Arizona shootings that left Rep. Gabrielle Giffords in critical condition, six people dead and more than a dozen injured on Jan. 8, 2011 are questions about the nature and culture of gun violence in the United States.Two researchers from HSPH’s Harvard Injury Control Research Center, director David Hemenway and research specialist Mary Vriniotis, were recently interviewed about the tragedy and U.S. gun control laws.Hemenway was invited onto WBUR’s Radio Boston to discuss whether even in Massachusetts, a state with some of the country’s strictest gun laws, someone like the Arizona shooter could have obtained a weapon. Vriniotis appeared on a special hour-long segment of WGBH’s The Emily Rooney Show about the shootings to comment on gun legislation nationwide. There is no national prohibition, said Vriniotis, on the kind of semiautomatic handgun used by Jared Loughner, the alleged killer. “By making that gun easily accessible, that’s how events like this happen,” she said.last_img read more

Decision reserved on Canadian fashion mogul Nygard’s bail

first_imgWINNIPEG, Manitoba (AP) — Canadian fashion mogul Peter Nygard will remain in jail for at least another week despite his lawyers laying out an updated bail plan. Nyard, was arrested last month on U.S. charges that alleging he sexually abused women and girls after luring them into his orbit with opportunities in fashion and modeling over the last 25 years. The U.S. wants him extradited.  Court of Queen’s Bench Justice Shawn Greenberg says she needs time to decide whether Nygard should be released and has reserved her decision until Feb. 5.last_img

National honor

first_imgBy Cheryl VarnadoeUniversity of GeorgiaGeorgia Commissioner of Agriculture Tommy Irvin is the newest member of the National 4-H Hall of Fame. Irvin received the honor during the National 4-H Conference in Chevy Chase, Md., Oct. 5.Irvin and 19 other inductees were selected for their contributions to 4-H and its nearly 7 million members. 4-H is the youth development program of U.S. land-grant universities.Commissioner, 4-H supporter for decadesGeorgia’s commission of agriculture since 1969, Irvin has served in many leadership roles that have benefited the Georgia 4-H program. For more than 20 years, he has actively served on the Georgia 4-H Foundation Board of Trustees and on other 4-H and University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences advisory committees.”I’ve been involved in 4-H for more than 50 years,” Irvin said. “I was a strong supporter when I was on the local school board, president of the Georgia School Boards Association, a state legislator and chief of staff for the governor and certainly have been the many years I have served as agriculture commissioner.”A 4-H donor, Irvin and his wife Bernice endow a scholarship for 4-H members and have leveraged and authorized hundreds of thousands of dollars to benefit 4-H.”4-H scholarships allow young people to continue to build on the skills and knowledge they learned through the 4-H programs,” he said. “We’ve seen the many varied opportunities for development that 4-H programs have afforded young people across the state, including our daughter, who was a national winner.”Eradicated hog cholera, boll weevilAs the state’s agriculture commissioner, Irvin’s efforts led to the eradication of hog cholera in the early 1970s. The U.S. Department of Agriculture adopted his plan nationally, which led to a hog-cholera-free nation in 1978.Irvin also implemented eradication programs for brucellosis and tuberculosis in livestock, and Georgia has since become free of those diseases. He developed and successfully implemented the Boll Weevil Eradication Program, too.Irvin’s other honors include serving as dean of Georgia’s Constitutional Officers and chairman of the Georgia Development Authority and Georgia Seed Development Commission.He’s a member of the Georgia State Financing and Investment Commission, Georgia Agrirama Development Authority and Georgia State Employee Benefits Plan Council and an ex-officio member of 11 Georgia agricultural commodity commissions.Irvin is the only Georgian ever to serve as president of the National Association of State Departments of Agriculture. He is also past president of the Southern Association of State Departments of Agriculture and the Southern U.S. Trade Association, an organization that promotes the export of Southern food and agricultural products.The National 4-H Hall of Fame was unveiled in 2002 as a 4-H centennial project. For more information, visit the National 4-H Hall of Fame Web site at www.nae4ha.org/hof.last_img read more

Trinidad and Tobago Sets the Standard in the Fight Against Ebola

first_imgTo talk about this difficult task and other issues involving Trinidad and Tobago’s national security, Diálogo met with Brig. Gen. Phillips Spencer at the XIII Caribbean Nations Security Conference (CANSEC), which took place in Nassau, Bahamas, at the end of January 2015. Most of the countries in the Caribbean are heavily dependent on tourism. Even for Trinidad and Tobago, a twin-island country rich in oil, the tourism industry is an important component of the national economy, so a single case of Ebola could seriously affect its national product. A potentially 30-to-50 percent drop in tourism was very possible in the region, according to the Caribbean Community Chairman and Antigua and Barbuda Prime Minister Gaston Browne. Maybe that’s the reason why Trinidad and Tobago took this threat seriously and decided to appoint Brigadier General Anthony Phillips Spencer, the Vice-Chief of Defence Staff, as lead of the National Ebola Prevention Information and Response Team. DIÁLOGO: Do you think the discussion will move from talk to action? DIÁLOGO: Do you feel that every country in the region is at the same level of standardization as Trinidad? Brig. Gen. Phillips Spencer: Correct. A plan is not a basis for action. Similarly, an instrument is not a basis for implementation.The instrument needs to be institutionalized. All of the actors need to come together and determine how we will organize ourselves, align our efforts, coordinate our capabilities and capacities, and then proceed to action. I think the discussion at this CANSEC focused on how we will move from those instruments that have been approved for us in many instances by our governments to the effective execution and implementation of those measures that will deal with the many issues that threaten the security of our citizens. DIÁLOGO: In October of 2014, you were appointed as the lead of the National Ebola Prevention Information and Response Team. How is that effort going? Is it working well? Brig. Gen. Phillips Spencer: Information sharing is predicated on two imperatives. The first is trust. The second is standardization. Trust really goes to the issues of making sure that the risks involved in sharing information by any country can be managed and the best response, and the best context in which you feel comfortable accepting those risks is where there is trust. Building trust among security partners in the Hemisphere requires us to be sure that we have set the same standards for screening and vetting, and all of those things, making sure the level of professionalism in all of the agencies involved in information sharing is at a sufficiently acceptable level. So, two issues: it’s about trust, it’s about standardization. No country would want to know that it has, in good faith, offered sensitive information to another country to then discover that that information has not been treated with the appropriate level of confidence. Brig. Gen. Phillips Spencer: I can’t speak for the other countries. What I know is that when the CARICOM heads met in Port of Spain in early December, they agreed that all of its member states would work together and that we would be prepared to support each other. For instance, we have already received a request for assistance from Grenada, because it’s a matter of the capacity of the public health infrastructure in every country. Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Guinea were three countries in West Africa with very underdeveloped public health infrastructures, and it’s for that reason that containing the spread of the Ebola disease has proven to be so difficult. You’ll observe that in Nigeria, a country with a much more sophisticated and developed public health infrastructure, recovery for an incident was very swift. Brig. Gen. Phillips Spencer: Information sharing is predicated on two imperatives. The first is trust. The second is standardization. Trust really goes to the issues of making sure that the risks involved in sharing information by any country can be managed and the best response, and the best context in which you feel comfortable accepting those risks is where there is trust. Building trust among security partners in the Hemisphere requires us to be sure that we have set the same standards for screening and vetting, and all of those things, making sure the level of professionalism in all of the agencies involved in information sharing is at a sufficiently acceptable level. So, two issues: it’s about trust, it’s about standardization. No country would want to know that it has, in good faith, offered sensitive information to another country to then discover that that information has not been treated with the appropriate level of confidence. Brigadier General Anthony Phillips Spencer: I think we achieved a level of openness on the need for very concrete action on matters that have been discussed at CANSEC in the past. I think the focus on improving the regional training system is a clear indication of the success of CANSEC 2015. You note as well that the issue of information-sharing is so critical to our success when we work together to deal with threats like illicit trafficking; it was another year where clearly there is a deep commitment to taking action beyond many of the things that we have discussed in the past. Brig. Gen. Phillips Spencer: Absolutely. In fact, during the conference, you may have heard the Executive Director of CARICOM IMPACS, Mr. Francis Forbes, referring to JIATF-South as the ideal type of information sharing hub. It is because at JIATF-South, the standards are sufficiently high to afford and to convey that there is trust in the system for information sharing. Therefore anyone seeking to participate in information sharing through JIATF-South’s arrangement must be prepared to meet the standard. That’s why I spoke earlier about the importance of standardization. You can’t come to the game unprepared to meet the standards that are required. DIÁLOGO: But information sharing apparently works well when it comes to the Joint Interagency Task Force-South (JIATF-South), where different agencies from different countries work very close together. Is this a model that should be replicated? DIÁLOGO: Do you feel that every country in the region is at the same level of standardization as Trinidad? DIÁLOGO: During CANSEC 2015, there were many discussions about information gathering and sharing. Why is this so hard to implement? By Dialogo March 10, 2015 DIÁLOGO: Talking about transnational organized crime, two years ago, one of the biggest issues in Trinidad and Tobago was the fact that drugs were passing through the country, even though they were not staying, but the drug traffickers were leaving behind weapons that fell into the hands of the youth, especially young males. Did this problem diminish since? Brigadier General Anthony Phillips Spencer: I think we achieved a level of openness on the need for very concrete action on matters that have been discussed at CANSEC in the past. I think the focus on improving the regional training system is a clear indication of the success of CANSEC 2015. You note as well that the issue of information-sharing is so critical to our success when we work together to deal with threats like illicit trafficking; it was another year where clearly there is a deep commitment to taking action beyond many of the things that we have discussed in the past. Brig. Gen. Phillips Spencer: Absolutely. In fact, during the conference, you may have heard the Executive Director of CARICOM IMPACS, Mr. Francis Forbes, referring to JIATF-South as the ideal type of information sharing hub. It is because at JIATF-South, the standards are sufficiently high to afford and to convey that there is trust in the system for information sharing. Therefore anyone seeking to participate in information sharing through JIATF-South’s arrangement must be prepared to meet the standard. That’s why I spoke earlier about the importance of standardization. You can’t come to the game unprepared to meet the standards that are required. DIÁLOGO: During CANSEC 2015, there were many discussions about information gathering and sharing. Why is this so hard to implement? Brig. Gen. Phillips Spencer: Correct. A plan is not a basis for action. Similarly, an instrument is not a basis for implementation.The instrument needs to be institutionalized. All of the actors need to come together and determine how we will organize ourselves, align our efforts, coordinate our capabilities and capacities, and then proceed to action. I think the discussion at this CANSEC focused on how we will move from those instruments that have been approved for us in many instances by our governments to the effective execution and implementation of those measures that will deal with the many issues that threaten the security of our citizens. DIÁLOGO: What are you taking away from this conference? DIÁLOGO: Do you think the discussion will move from talk to action? DIÁLOGO: In October of 2014, you were appointed as the lead of the National Ebola Prevention Information and Response Team. How is that effort going? Is it working well? Brig. Gen. Phillips Spencer: I can’t speak for the other countries. What I know is that when the CARICOM heads met in Port of Spain in early December, they agreed that all of its member states would work together and that we would be prepared to support each other. For instance, we have already received a request for assistance from Grenada, because it’s a matter of the capacity of the public health infrastructure in every country. Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Guinea were three countries in West Africa with very underdeveloped public health infrastructures, and it’s for that reason that containing the spread of the Ebola disease has proven to be so difficult. You’ll observe that in Nigeria, a country with a much more sophisticated and developed public health infrastructure, recovery for an incident was very swift. Brig. Gen. Phillips Spencer: There is no question that in Trinidad and Tobago there are more illegal firearms than we would be comfortable with. The good news is that in 2014, the Trinidad and Tobago Police Service has succeeded in taking the highest number of firearms off the streets, more than they have ever taken off the streets in many years. It means that if illegal weapons continue to arrive and get left behind, it is our problem and our capacity to take them off the streets has improved. The next requirement is to prevent those illegal firearms from even entering our jurisdiction, so for that reason the Ministry of National Security is seeking to equip the Coast Guard with the necessary vessels and interceptors to improve the rate at which we are able to secure our borders from the infiltration and the importation of illegal firearms. DIÁLOGO: But information sharing apparently works well when it comes to the Joint Interagency Task Force-South (JIATF-South), where different agencies from different countries work very close together. Is this a model that should be replicated? DIÁLOGO: What are you taking away from this conference? To talk about this difficult task and other issues involving Trinidad and Tobago’s national security, Diálogo met with Brig. Gen. Phillips Spencer at the XIII Caribbean Nations Security Conference (CANSEC), which took place in Nassau, Bahamas, at the end of January 2015. Brig. Gen. Phillips Spencer: Yes. I think we are doing well. One of the key insights for responding to or being prepared to respond to the Ebola virus is a clear understanding that no single agency – Ministry of Health, Ministry of National Security– can respond effectively to this disease. And so once we were able to achieve a willingness on the part of the key actors to work together, we found that implementing a strategy that we have developed became very achievable. So, at this point, we have, in fact, been able to conduct several simulation exercises. We have done all our site-readiness surveys at all ports in Trinidad and Tobago. We have established vessel quarantine anchorages for any vessels entering our jurisdiction. At our respective airports, we have been able to establish isolation rooms in the case of Piarco and isolation wraps in the case of also at the Robinson Airport in Tobago, and we are now at a point where we have developed SOPs [Standard Operation Procedure] for several of the other areas and specific events for which we have to be ready and are now moving to simulation exercises. It really has required us to bring all stakeholders together, so we have not only public sector agencies, we have private sector agencies, too. We have civil society agencies, we have labor unions being represented as part of the team, because bear in mind that anyone who has a stake in preventing the arrival or the importation of the Ebola virus will want to be involved in the process. Apart from that, we have really succeeded at making sure that we reach out to the respective communities in Trinidad and Tobago. For instance, after my return to Port of Spain, we will meet with the Cora community. Cora Village is where the Ebola Treatment Center for Trinidad and Tobago has been established and therefore we need to engage directly with that community so they understand very intimately the extent to which we have taken measures to minimize risk to them as a result of having an Ebola treatment center in their community. So, I think we are doing well. Brig. Gen. Phillips Spencer: Yes. I think we are doing well. One of the key insights for responding to or being prepared to respond to the Ebola virus is a clear understanding that no single agency – Ministry of Health, Ministry of National Security– can respond effectively to this disease. And so once we were able to achieve a willingness on the part of the key actors to work together, we found that implementing a strategy that we have developed became very achievable. So, at this point, we have, in fact, been able to conduct several simulation exercises. We have done all our site-readiness surveys at all ports in Trinidad and Tobago. We have established vessel quarantine anchorages for any vessels entering our jurisdiction. At our respective airports, we have been able to establish isolation rooms in the case of Piarco and isolation wraps in the case of also at the Robinson Airport in Tobago, and we are now at a point where we have developed SOPs [Standard Operation Procedure] for several of the other areas and specific events for which we have to be ready and are now moving to simulation exercises. It really has required us to bring all stakeholders together, so we have not only public sector agencies, we have private sector agencies, too. We have civil society agencies, we have labor unions being represented as part of the team, because bear in mind that anyone who has a stake in preventing the arrival or the importation of the Ebola virus will want to be involved in the process. Apart from that, we have really succeeded at making sure that we reach out to the respective communities in Trinidad and Tobago. For instance, after my return to Port of Spain, we will meet with the Cora community. Cora Village is where the Ebola Treatment Center for Trinidad and Tobago has been established and therefore we need to engage directly with that community so they understand very intimately the extent to which we have taken measures to minimize risk to them as a result of having an Ebola treatment center in their community. So, I think we are doing well. Most of the countries in the Caribbean are heavily dependent on tourism. Even for Trinidad and Tobago, a twin-island country rich in oil, the tourism industry is an important component of the national economy, so a single case of Ebola could seriously affect its national product. A potentially 30-to-50 percent drop in tourism was very possible in the region, according to the Caribbean Community Chairman and Antigua and Barbuda Prime Minister Gaston Browne. Maybe that’s the reason why Trinidad and Tobago took this threat seriously and decided to appoint Brigadier General Anthony Phillips Spencer, the Vice-Chief of Defence Staff, as lead of the National Ebola Prevention Information and Response Team. DIÁLOGO: Talking about transnational organized crime, two years ago, one of the biggest issues in Trinidad and Tobago was the fact that drugs were passing through the country, even though they were not staying, but the drug traffickers were leaving behind weapons that fell into the hands of the youth, especially young males. Did this problem diminish since? Brig. Gen. Phillips Spencer: There is no question that in Trinidad and Tobago there are more illegal firearms than we would be comfortable with. The good news is that in 2014, the Trinidad and Tobago Police Service has succeeded in taking the highest number of firearms off the streets, more than they have ever taken off the streets in many years. It means that if illegal weapons continue to arrive and get left behind, it is our problem and our capacity to take them off the streets has improved. The next requirement is to prevent those illegal firearms from even entering our jurisdiction, so for that reason the Ministry of National Security is seeking to equip the Coast Guard with the necessary vessels and interceptors to improve the rate at which we are able to secure our borders from the infiltration and the importation of illegal firearms. yes I think you are doing a very good job, keep up the good work against human trafficking and exploitation for the benefit of the young people who are our future generation. I am Donna Dussard from Dover, St. Marylast_img read more

Westbury Woman’s Murder Sparks Manhunt

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York An international manhunt is underway for the man that authorities suspect killed a 22-year-old Westbury woman last week in her home near Binghamton University, where she was a nursing student, police said.Binghamton police officers responded to Haley Anderson’s off-campus home on Oak Street, where she was found dead shortly before 1 p.m. Friday, authorities said. She was taken to Lourdes Hospital, where an autopsy found she was a victim of a homicide.“This incident and the circumstances of the death was not a random act or involving the conduct of a stranger,” Binghamton police said in a statement.Investigators identified her ex-boyfriend, 22-year-old Orlando Tercero, as a person of interest in the case. Tercero flew to Nicaragua before police found the victim’s body, authorities said. Tercero is a US citizen, they noted. Nicaraguan authorities reportedly detained him.A GoFundMe page collecting money for her funeral raised more than $36,000 as of Tuesday.Detectives are continuing the investigation with the assistance of New York State University Police at Binghamton, the Broome County District Attorney’s Office, the FBI, the Port Authority Police Department and Nassau County police.Anyone with information is encouraged to contact the Binghamton Police Detective Division at 607-772- 7080 or 607-772-7082.last_img read more