Protest against sealing of metal melting units

first_imgAfter hundreds of artisans in Moradabad working in the brass industry protested on Monday against the administration’s action against coal-fired hearths for causing pollution, Member of Parliament S.T. Hasan submitted a memorandum to Environment Minister Prakash Javdekar in Delhi on Tuesday.In the memorandum, Dr. Hasan said the action has affected the livelihood of artisans. “Pollution is indeed a big problem, but it should not mean that in an effort to control it we make some people die of hunger,” he said. He appealed to the Environment Ministry that the small units which were running from residential areas be spared for six months till the infrastructure for PNG-based furnaces was laid.‘Provide alternative’ Noman Mansoori, president of the Handicraft Development Society, said artisans were being rendered jobless without being provided an alternative. “Moradabad has around 500 big and 2,000 small metal melting units. The major cause of pollution is smoke from the big units and illegal units where e-waste is dumped. The smaller units, run from home, are those where the artisan cook food and smelt the metal on the same hearth. It causes only as much pollution as a chulha does,” he argued. “But units are being sealed and a heavy penalty is being imposed on poor artisans,” he said, alleging in some cases the police try to extort money from artisans.He said the society created a prototype of PNG-based furnace with the help of experts and offered it to Torrent Gas which is laying pipeline in the city for domestic use. The company gave one commercial connection in Rahmat Nagar in Karula locality in October this year, Mr. Mansoori said. “However, the plan didn’t take off as the artisans are spread across the city. It is for the administration to use funds allocated for Smart City Mission to resettle the artisans in one area.” .Ajay Sharma, Regional Manager, U.P. Pollution Control Board, said in the last two months 66 metal melting units, four illegal e-waste dumping units and one illegal foundry have been sealed. He said small units also cause pollution. “It is just that the amount of particulate matter 2.5 released in the air by them is around one-third of what is released by big units. We take action against really small units only when we get a complaint from the neighbourhood. Often asthma patients complain,” he said.last_img read more

SEA Games: Gilas cadets survive Thailand

first_imgTrending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games03:07PH billiards team upbeat about gold medal chances in SEA Games05:25PH boxing team determined to deliver gold medals for PH03:04Filipino athletes share their expectations for 2019 SEA Games00:45Onyok Velasco see bright future for PH boxing in Olympics02:25PH women’s volleyball team motivated to deliver in front of hometown crowd01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games00:36Manny Pacquiao part of 2019 SEA Games opening ceremony FIl-German Christian Standhardinger split a charity but hurt his left hand in the process and had to sit out for a few precious minutes.Teerwat Chantachot made it 68-65 which forced Gilas to push the panic button and saw emotions running wild.Kobe Paras lashed at the referee and had a shouting match with Kevin Ferrer at the bench as the rest of the bench tried to pacify the 19-year-old sensation.In what was billed as preview of the finals, Gilas tried use its brimming individual talent to good use by putting up a quick 10-points lead, 22-12, the first quarter.But the shooting went sour in the second quarter as Gilas allowed Thailand’s Chitchai Anati  and Chanatip Jakrawan to come away with crucial baskets.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ View comments Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo Soon enough the Thais were ahead, 33-32, but Christian Standhardinger quickly gave Gilas back the lead entering the second half.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Pagasa: Storm intensifies as it nears PAR Gilas cadets during a timeout against Thailand in the 2017 SEA Games basketball tournament. INQUIRER/ Marc Anthony ReyesKUALA LUMPUR—Under siege, Gilas Pilipinas relied on its individual brilliance — and not much on teamwork — to pull off an 81-74 victory over Thailand at the start of the 2017 Southeast Asian Games basketball tournament at MABA Stadium here.Kiefer Ravena sank a jumper and two free throws in the tension-filled last three minutes as the Philippines finally wiggled free from Thailand’s grip.ADVERTISEMENT Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his sidecenter_img LATEST STORIES Vietnam shuts out PH in men’s football Ravena’s free throw gave the Philippines the lead, 73-71, with four minutes left and then his jumper gave it more breathing space, 75-71.Asean Basketball League star Tyler Lamb nailed a triple to give Thailand a 46-45 lead early in the third as Gilas encountered difficulty smoothing its offence despite the presence of some of the A-list players in its fold.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingBut Lamb picked up his fifth and final foul in the early fourth quarter which turned things around for the Philippines.In the third quarter, Thailand even held a 66-64 lead with seven minutes left in the game. Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong protesters NATO’s aging eye in the sky to get a last overhaullast_img read more

Balijatra festival begins in Cuttack

first_imgCuttack, Nov 4 (PTI) As the holy month of Kartika ended with a colorful ritual of Boita Bandana (worshipping of boats) this morning, the annual Balijatra? festival began on the banks of river Mahanadi here at Gadagadia ghat in the evening.Odisha Health and Law minister Pratap Jena along with Culture minister Ashok Panda and Sports minister Chandra Sarathi Behera inaugurated the Balijatra festival in the presence of city mayor Meenakshi Behera.The week-long famous fair will continue till November 10.After getting the nod from east zone bench of National Green Tribunal for the second time this year, the local administration is staging the festival over an area of 30 acres on the river bank.”We will ensure that the festival would in no way pollute or block the free-flow of river water”, said Cuttack Municipal Corporation, Commissioner, Bikash Mohapatra.”Over one lakh revelers thronged the fair grounds on the inaugural day and we expect the festival would witness footfall of over three lakh revelers every day”, said the newly appointed DCP Traffic Srikrushna Sasmal.Like every year, the twin fair grounds having over 300 makeshift stalls are showcasing ethnic household items ranging from wearing apparels to decorative stuffs.The Commissionerate police have made elaborate arrangements to maintain law and order during the festival. DCP City Akhileswar Singh said around 50 platoons (one platoon comprise 30 personnel) of armed police, including quick action team, anti-liquor squad, anti sabotage and anti terrorists squads will be deployed in and around the festival grounds.. PTI COR AAM RGadvertisementlast_img read more

Argentina and China sign deals strengthening ties after G-20

first_imgBuenos Aires, Dec 3 (AP) China’s president signed new trade deals with Argentina on Sunday as the Asian giant expands its growing role in Latin American economies.Presidents Mauricio Macri of Argentina and Xi Jinping of China announced the more than 30 agriculture and investment deals during a state visit following the Group of 20 summit in Buenos Aires.The deals include an agreement to export Argentine cherries to China and an expansion of a currency swap.China is among Argentina’s top export markets, especially for agricultural commodities that are the engine of its economy.It is also one of Argentina’s biggest lenders, financing about USD 18.2 billion in infrastructure and other projects, according to the Inter-American Dialogue, a Washington-based think tank.”China’s development benefits Argentina, our region and the world,” Macri said during a ceremony at the presidential residence in the outskirts of the Argentine capital.”We have complementary countries. There are few countries in the world that can buy so many of the high-quality products that we’re capable of making,” Macri said.The visit comes after US officials said they had reached a 90-day truce in the trade dispute with China that has rattled financial markets and imperiled global economic growth.That announcement followed a Saturday dinner meeting between Xi and President Donald Trump.Argentina also granted Xi the top honour awarded to foreign politicians, and the Argentine polo association gave the Chinese leader a polo horse.The South American country is home to the world’s top polo players, and Macri said that he wants the sport to make a comeback in China.advertisementPhotos released by Argentina’s presidency showed a smiling Xi petting the pony with one hand and holding the reins with the other.Macri also put a red polo helmet emblazoned with China’s flag on Xi’s head.Xi congratulated Macri on a successful summit and said both of their nations believe the G-20 spirit of solidarity must prevail in “the firm defense of multilateralism and free trade to build an open global economy and foment the world’s prosperity and stability.”Xi then flew to Panama, which has been negotiating a free-trade deal with China after shifting its diplomatic recognition to Beijing from Taiwan last year, a move that led to complaints from US officials.Chinese companies operate ports on both ends of the Panama Canal, which for most of the 20th Century was seen as a symbol of US influence.Xi was met at the airport by Panamanian President Juan Carlos Varela, and the two leaders planned a private working meeting Monday.The Chinese leader also planned to visit the Cocoli locks on the Pacific end of the canal. (AP) RUPRUPlast_img read more

Return Game a Glaring Weakness for Oklahoma State

first_imgWith the notable history of prominent return specialists like Justin Gilbert and Josh Stewart in recent years, this season has certainly been a change of pace that has been less than impressive.Punt ReturnAccording to NCAA statistics, Oklahoma State ranks 119th in punt return yard average out of 127 total FBS teams. Of the 14 punt returns, the team has only gained 32 total yards, averaging just 2.29 yards per return. This mark ranks last in the Big 12.Kick ReturnThe kick return game has been slightly better, but there is still a lack of a homerun threat that this team desperately needs. Oklahoma State is averaging 22.08 yards per return, which ranks 51st in the nation. Michigan currently leads the nation in kick return yards with nearly 40 yards per return. Despite the low ranking, Oklahoma St. is ranked No. 2 in the Big 12 behind TCU in kickoff return yards.If you’re looking for the comments section, it has moved to our forum, The Chamber. You can go there to comment and holler about these articles, specifically in these threads. You can register for a free account right here and will need one to comment.If you’re wondering why we decided to do this, we wrote about that here. Thank you and cheers!last_img read more

9 months agoTottenham midfielder Dembele travels for Beijing Guoan medical

first_imgTottenham midfielder Dembele travels for Beijing Guoan medicalby Freddie Taylor9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveTottenham Hotspur midfielder Mousa Dembele is travelling to Hong Kong today in order to undergo a medical with Beijing Sinobo Guoan. Spurs accepted an offer from the Chinese Super League club last week, reportedly worth £9m.Dembele, 31, would have become a free agent at the end of the season.The Belgian made 249 appearances in his six-and-a-half year spell in north London. TagsTransfersAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your saylast_img

Uber for snow removal New app inspired by Winnipegs winter weather

first_imgWINNIPEG — When the first big snow dump covered Winnipeg this week, the developers of a new phone app put their technology to the test.“You can think of it as Uber for snow removal,” said OnTheStep founder Buhle Mwanza, referring to the ride-hailing app.Mwanza spent months developing the on-demand snow clearing app, which connects homeowners with shovellers — called steppers — to get their driveways and walkways cleared.Looking around at snow-covered driveways on Thursday, the University of Manitoba computer science student said he was inspired by Winnipeg’s nickname of Winterpeg.“I was just thinking why not make a problem all of us have to go through as innovative and fun as possible and really embrace that Winterpeg identity?”Homeowners can download the app for free and set up a profile, including location, size of driveway and how many cars park there. When the snow starts to fall, as it always does in large quantities in Winnipeg, they can request shovelling services from their phone.Once a price is set, a shovelling notification goes out to all the steppers in the area and one — or a team, depending on the size of the job — will get to work.Homeowners get notifications of each aspect of the job: when the stepper arrives, when the work is done, and when the money goes through.The app launched earlier this month, but the city had yet to see much snow. As Environment Canada put out a special weather statement for the incoming winter storm on Wednesday, Mwanza became excited to see if people would want the service and how it would all work. He went to the first shovel request himself and the homeowner was so excited, they took photos together. But soon after, more and more requests started to come in.OnTheStep recently partnered with Hire-A-Refugee, a local organization that connects refugees with jobs, but the demand for services was outpacing the supply of shovellers.So Mwanza, along with the other OnTheStep team members — Tyrel Praymayer, Alex Shao and Tristen Wong — pulled out their shovels and got to work. From the first request Wednesday afternoon until around 3 a.m. Thursday, the group trudged up and down driveways with shovels.“I feel like snow and Winnipeg is sort of like a bonding experience. We all have to deal with it,” said Praymayer, OnTheStep’s marketing manager and student at the Asper School of Business at the University of Manitoba.“Winnipeg is great inspiration for this app. It’s a beautiful way of incorporating Winnipeg into innovation.”Despite a night and morning of shovelling, team members said they are excited by the demand of the first big snowfall.“Snow definitely has a different identity in our mindsets now,” Mwanza said.Kelly Geraldine Malone, The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Morocco Wins 33rd Tunisia International Cycling Tour

Rabat – Moroccan cycling team won the 33rd Tunisia International Cycling Tour, held on May 21-24 May, while Moroccan cyclist Essaid Abelouach got the green jersey for the best climber.The Moroccan squad led the team standing, followed by the continental team “Al Marakeb,” while the Emirati team of Sharjah ranked third.Nearly 70 cyclists representing 12 teams from Tunisia, the United Arab Emirates, Egypt, Algeria, Libya and Morocco took part in the 33rd Tunisia International Tour, a leg of the UCI Africa Tour. With MAP

Ministries told not to issue separate statements

President Sirisena issued the instructions when asked today about a compensation package announced by the Finance Ministry.The President said the statement was wrong and he urged Ministries not to issue separate statements which could mislead the public. (Colombo Gazette) President Maithripala Sirisena today instructed Ministries not to issue separate statements on Meethotamulla.The President issued the instructions after an erroneous statement was issued on the compensation to be offered for the victims.

Thiess gets autonomous haulage retrofit contract from Fortescue for Christmas Creek trucks

first_imgThiess has secured a contract from Fortescue Metals Group to install autonomous haulage system technology at its Christmas Creek operations in Western Australia’s Pilbara region. Under the 18-month contract, Thiess will convert a minimum of 65 conventional haul trucks to the system, along with various sub-component installs of the system on ancillary equipment to allow the machinery to autonomously operate at Fortescue’s Chichester Hubs.The contracted work includes the installation of the system onto Fortescue’s Komatsu 930E and Caterpillar 789D trucks. CIMIC Group Chief Executive Officer Michael Wright said: “This contract reinforces Thiess’ positive working relationship with Fortescue and strengthens our position as a leading provider of autonomous services.”CIMIC Group Executive Mining and Mineral Processing and Thiess Managing Director Douglas Thompson said: “We are pleased to continue working with Fortescue to deliver autonomous systems to its mining fleet. Our work at Christmas Creek builds on our strong record of delivery for Fortescue at their Solomon Mine, where we assisted in the upgrade of their autonomous fleet. Our team is thrilled to work with Fortescue in leading mining innovation and delivering solutions that are firsts for our industry.”last_img read more

Quickthinking resident helps limit damage in Sunnyside house fire

first_imgA quick-thinking resident helped limit the damage from a bedroom fire at a home in the Sunnyside neighborhood Saturday morning, according to the Vancouver Fire Department.The fire was reported at 6 a.m. at 6003 N.E. 112th St., according to paramedic-firefighter Kevin Stromberg. He said crews arriving seven minutes later found smoke and fire coming out of an upstairs bedroom on the rear of the house and through an aggressive interior attack were able to contain the fire to that one bedroom.The firefighters were assisted by the quick actions of a woman who lived in the house. Before she evacuated the house with two cats, she was able to close the door to the burning room.Stromberg said her actions “drastically reduced the spread of the fire and the spread of the smoke.”“It was very good thinking on her part,” he said.No one was injured, and the woman declined assistance from the Red Cross.Twenty firefighters from the Vancouver Fire Department, Clark County Fire District 6 and Clark County Fire & Rescue were on scene.The fire is being investigated by the Clark County Fire Marshal’s Office.last_img read more

Benitez understands fans frustration on lack of signings

first_imgNewcastle manager Rafael Benitez says he understands the fans’ frustration with lack of transfer activities after they wrote an open letter to the club owner.Even though he refused to comment on the club’s transfer activities in the January window, Benitez understood the supporters position and how they feel.The Newcastle United fans group wrote an open letter to Mike Ashley on Thursday demanding signings in the transfer window.With sales talks ongoing in the background, the club has slipped to 15th place in the league table and the fans are wary of a relegation battle and have called for reinforcements.Benitez told Sky Sports: “The communications department is really good so they have passed me the information.Premier LeaguePremier League Betting: Match-day 5 Stuart Heath – September 14, 2019 Going into the Premier League’s match-day five with a gap already beginning to form at the top of the league. We will take a…“The fans are saying that they want to compete, they want to stay in the Premier League.“The fans have been fantastic all season. They have the ambition to do something good for this club. I can understand what they think.“At the same time, my position is that I will not talk about the transfer window because I have to concentrate on just coaching the team.”last_img read more

Experimental treatment allows SVP Alan James to be released back into San

first_img Categories: Local San Diego News Tags: Allen James FacebookTwitter July 25, 2019 KUSI Newsroom, 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – The final phase of this five step process involves releasing the felon back into the community. KUSI’s Ginger Jefferies has more on this special report looking into Alan James who was release less than fur months ago. KUSI Newsroom Experimental treatment allows S.V.P. Alan James to be released back into San Diego Posted: July 25, 2019last_img read more

Man steals Miami bus riders cellphone as doors open runs off

first_imgMIAMI (WSVN) – Surveillance video from a Miami-Dade Transit bus captured a man reaching over a seated rider’s shoulder and grabbing her cellphone just as the bus’ doors opened, then running off the bus.The robbery happened Jan. 16, at around 11:30 p.m., near Northeast Fourth Court and Northeast 79th Street.The victim notified the bus driver after it happened, but by the time police arrived, the thief was gone.“The robber is being described as a slim built, black male, 30 – 35 years old, approximately 5 feet 6 inches to 5 feet 7 inches tall,” Miami Police said. We need assistance identifying this offender who robbed a female for her cell phone, at NE 4 Ave & NE 79 St, as she sat on the bus. pic.twitter.com/Z4gOmCEIED— Miami PD (@MiamiPD) March 1, 2017If you recognize the robber, call Miami-Dade Crime Stoppers at 305-471-TIPS. Remember, you can always remain anonymous, and you may be eligible for a $1,000 reward. Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img read more

N Korea deplores US sanctions

first_imgIn this file photo taken on 12 June 2018, US president Donald Trump (R) and North Korea`s leader Kim Jong Un shake hands following a signing ceremony during their historic US-North Korea summit, at the Capella Hotel on Sentosa island in Singapore. Photo: AFPNorth Korea has condemned the United States over its latest sanctions measures, warning the policy could “block the path to denuclearisation on the Korean peninsula forever”.The warning from the North on Sunday came days after the US said it was imposing sanctions on three senior North Korean officials over human rights abuses.The sanctioned officials include Choe Ryong Hae, who has been considered a right-hand man to leader Kim Jong Un.In a statement carried by the official KCNA news agency, the North praised president Donald Trump for his efforts to improve relations with Pyongyang, but said the US state department was “bent on bringing the DPRK-US relations back to the status of last year which was marked by exchanges of fire”.The statement by the policy research director of the Institute for American Studies of the foreign ministry accused the US of “deliberate provocation” over the sanctions on the three officials.If Washington believes the policy of increased sanctions and pressure would force the North to give up its nuclear weapons, “it will count as greatest miscalculation, and it will block the path to denuclearisation on the Korean peninsula forever”, the statement added.At a historic summit in Singapore in June, US president Donald Trump and Kim signed a vaguely-worded statement on denuclearisation.But little progress has been made since then, with Washington pushing to maintain sanctions against the North until its “final, fully verified denuclearisation” and Pyongyang condemning US demands as “gangster-like”.In actions required by Congress, the Trump administration said on Monday it would seize any US assets of the three officials over their roles in suppressing freedom of speech.Such restrictions may have little impact on officials in one of the world’s most closed countries but will have a clear symbolic force as North Korea seeks greater acceptance by the United States.last_img

Lithiumion battery with new chemistry could power electric vehicles

first_img The researchers, Jusef Hassoun, Ki-Soo Lee, Yang-Kook Sun, and Bruno Scrosati, from the University of Rome Sapienza in Rome, Italy, and Hanyang University in Seoul, South Korea, have published their study on the advanced lithium-ion battery in a recent issue of the Journal of the American Chemical Society.Their study builds on the team’s previous research involving the development of novel, advanced lithium-ion battery chemistries. The key to the high performance lies in the battery’s electrode materials. Here, the scientists use a tin-carbon anode and a cathode made of lithium manganese oxide doped with nickel and cobalt. As far as the researchers know, a lithium-ion battery with this unique electrode combination has never been reported before.“The battery is based on a new combination between a high-voltage cathode and a nanostructured anode material,” Scrosati told PhysOrg.com. “The battery operates with a very stable capacity at high discharge rates with no significant capacity losses throughout the entire cycling test.”The new electrode materials provide certain advantages for the overall battery. As the researchers previously demonstrated, the tin-carbon anode has a high cycling life of several hundred cycles without a reduction in capacity, as well as discharge-charge efficiency approaching 100%. By applying a surface treatment to the anode, the researchers could further improve the capacity.As for the new manganese-based cathode materials, they are more abundant, less expensive, more environmentally friendly, and have a higher stability at low temperatures compared to the lithium cobalt oxide cathode used in conventional lithium-ion batteries. Also, in designing the new cathode, the researchers carefully optimized the composition, particle size, shape, morphology, and tap density.“The battery has: 1) a high volumetric and gravimetric energy density; 2) a high rate capability due to the nano-structured characteristics of the electrode materials; 3) an excellent cycle life; and 4) low cost, due to the use of electrode materials based on abundant elements,” Scrosati said.The cathode’s high voltage and high capacity provides the new battery with a higher energy density (170 Wh/kg at average discharge voltage of 4.2 volts) than conventional lithium-ion batteries.“The conventional lithium-ion batteries have an energy density of about 120-150 Wh/kg, depending on the used cathode material,” Scrosati said. “Generally, commercial lithium battery cells using layer structure cathode materials, for instance, NCA and NMC, deliver from 100 to 150 Wh/kg.”Altogether, the high energy density, stable cycle life, and high rate capacity suggest that the battery looks very promising for powering electric vehicles.“In summary, with respect to those using conventional lithium-ion batteries, electric vehicles using our battery may assure: 1) a longer driving range (210 km/charge vs. 150 km/charge due to the higher energy density; 2) a higher top speed; 3) a lower cost; and 4) better overall performance especially at low temperatures,” Scrosati said. Citation: Lithium-ion battery with new chemistry could power electric vehicles (2011, February 21) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-02-lithium-ion-battery-chemistry-power-electric.html Lithium-air batteries’ high energy density could extend range of electric vehicles More information: Jusef Hassoun, et al. “An Advanced Lithium Ion Battery Based on High Performance Electrode Materials.” Journal of the American Chemical Society. DOI:10.1021/ja110522x Explore further (PhysOrg.com) — While car companies race to develop electric and hybrid electric vehicles, one of the biggest challenges they face is finding a suitable energy storage system. Lithium-ion batteries, which currently power a variety of smaller consumer electronics devices, could ideally fill this role. But at the moment, they require further improvements in terms of energy density and power density in order to be used effectively in electric vehicles. Now in a new study, researchers have developed a novel type of lithium-ion battery with an anode and cathode that involve new, advanced battery chemistries, greatly improving the battery’s performance and likely making it suitable for electric vehicles. Copyright 2010 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Images of the cathode, which is made of lithium manganese oxide doped with nickel and cobalt, as seen under a field emission scanning electron microscope. Image credit: Jusef Hassoun, et al. ©2011 American Chemical Society. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Study of diversity training suggests it doesnt lead to much change

first_img Citation: Study of diversity training suggests it doesn’t lead to much change (2019, April 2) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-04-diversity-doesnt.html © 2019 Science X Network Credit: CC0 Public Domain Explore further Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Survey shows more work needs to be done on diversity and inclusion in workplacescenter_img Diversity training has been in the news a lot lately—though it is not clear how well it works. At its core, diversity training involves classes meant to teach employees the rules involved in treatment of people that are different from them—how to not be racist or how to not treat women as second-class citizens, for example. In this new effort, the researchers sought to determine if diversity training actually results in changes in the workplace.The researchers designed their own diversity training program and sent it out to willing organizations —in all, they got 3,016 employees to volunteer for the training in 63 countries. The training was focused on highlighting stereotypes and how they can lead to certain behaviors, and ways employees could overcome biases. The researchers then followed up by measuring changes that resulted due to the training.The researchers found little evidence of behavior change in any of the organizations where employees had taken the diversity training program. In the program geared toward reducing biases against women, the researchers found that employees were willing to admit such biases, they just were not willing to do anything about them. They also found employees not in the U.S. described themselves as more supportive of women after the training. In the U.S., the only change was that female employees expressed more willingness to mentor other women.In the part of the study focusing on racial bias, the researchers found that employees were willing to admit having racial biases, but no measurable changes in behavior were seen during follow-up. They also found that disadvantaged employees were more willing to mentor others.The researchers conclude by suggesting that organizations need to partner with research organizations to find ways to improve diversity training and to actively follow up to see if it does any good. More information: Edward H. Chang et al. The mixed effects of online diversity training, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2019). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1816076116 A team of researchers from the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School has found through experimentation that diversity training does not generally result in much change in work environments—though it might lead women and minorities to strengthen mentoring programs. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study, which involved giving a training program to 3,016 employees in 63 countries and the impact it had on them. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

CIDEO Advanced Visualization FlyThrough of Zoo Animal CT Scans

first_img Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Advanced Visualization Fly-Through of Zoo Animal CT ScansVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 2:37Loaded: 0.00%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -2:37 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. The Chicago Zoological Society’s (CZS) Brookfield Zoo is the first North American zoo to use 3-D advanced visualization imaging technology. This video shows a video fly-through of reconstructed 3-D computed tomography (CT) images of an aardvark, Humboldt penguin and African crested porcupine. The zoo is using Web-based software from Vizua. Read the related article. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Videos | Advanced Visualization | February 13, 2012 CIDEO: Advanced Visualization Fly-Through of Zoo Animal CT Scans Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Technology Reports View all 9 items CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Information Technology View all 220 items Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Find more SCCT news and videos Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Find more SCCT news and videos Conference Coverage View all 396 items Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting.center_img Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Women’s Health View all 62 items Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Recent Videos View all 606 items AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Find more news and videos from AAPM. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Find more news and videos from AAPM. Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting.last_img read more

Five things you should know about Chiang Mai

first_imgSource = ETB Travel News: Brittney Levinson Image credit: Brittney Levinson ETB Travel NewsDescribed as Thailand’s ‘Rose of the North’, Chiang Mai is one of the few places in Thailand where you can experience traditional and modern Thai culture seamlessly co-existing. Whether it’s in the form of lush green mountains, historic city temples or five-star luxury hotels, Chiang Mai’s beauty is undeniable. I recently spent some time in the city while attending Thailand Travel Mart Plus 2016, which was held in Chiang Mai for the very first time.It’s really no wonder I fell in love with Chiang Mai almost instantly; the friendly, laid-back nature of the locals is akin to the easy-going Australian culture. The moment I stepped out of the airport I was told that Chiang Mai is very different to Phuket or Bangkok – things move at a slower, more easy-going pace and it’s something the locals are definitely proud of.Five things you should know about Chiang Mai1. Luxury accommodation won’t break the bank137 Pillars House Chiang Mai. Image credit: Brittney Levinson ETB Travel NewsThere is no shortage of luxury accommodation in Chiang Mai and it is much more affordable than you would think. The Akyra Manor exudes luxury, right in the heart of the hip Artist Quarter of Chiang Mai. One night in a stylish Deluxe Suite with all the luxury trimmings, including a breathtaking bathtub on the balcony, costs as little as AU$250.The renowned 137 Pillars House Chiang Mai blends traditional and modern architecture to deliver a hidden sanctuary for guests seeking a luxurious Thai holiday. A night’s stay in this luxury haven will set you back around AU$500, complete with daily breakfast, a welcome drink and fruit basket, and free Wi-Fi throughout the property.2. You can hike in a national park by day and have fancy rooftop drinks by nightBeer Lab, Chiang Mai. Image credit: Brittney Levinson ETB Travel NewsAdventure seekers won’t be disappointed with what Chiang Mai has to offer, just as sophisticated types won’t be disappointed with the abundance of unique spots for a cocktail. Flight of the Gibbon offers ziplining tours about an hour out of the city and it is definitely worth a visit. Or head to Doi Inthanon National Park, home to Thailand’s highest mountain, for a guided hiking tour, where you can learn about the history and culture of the area while getting some gentle exercise.The best way to end a physically enduring day is with a drink (or three) at one of the city’s many bars. The Akyra Manor boasts an incredible rooftop bar with an impressive menu of cocktails, including classics with a unique twist.3. The food is next levelAmong the crowd favourites, like Pad Thai, green curry and sticky rice, Northern Thailand has its own unique dishes you would be a fool not to try. Don’t leave without trying the spicy Chiang Mai sausage and Khao soi, a soup-like dish topped with deep-fried crispy noodles. You’ll also find an abundance of Thai fruits, such as durian and mangosteen. And take my advice, every time you see a stall selling roti: stop, drop and eat. Seriously, you will never tire of light, crispy roti, covered in sweetened condensed milk and sugar – it’s the best.Khao soi. Image by Takeaway via Wikimedia Commons4. The facilities are state of the artAmong the beautiful, tradition architecture in Chiang Mai, there is also high quality, modern facilities and infrastructure. Built in 2013, the Chiang Mai International Exhibition and Convention Centre (CMECC) is one of the largest convention and exhibition centres in Southeast Asia, with 60,000 square metres of usable space. The centre recently welcomed guests from all over the globe for this year’s Thailand Travel Mart Plus.And even the roads are top quality. Driving up towards the famous Doi Suthep, the roads were modern, well signed and secured with barriers. It looked as though we were driving up a mountain in Australia.5. It’s a gateway to many destinationsThanks to growing air and land connectivity within the Greater Mekong Subregion, Chiang Mai is a gateway to key cities in Cambodia, Lao PDR., Myanmar, Vietnam. As well as being an ideal entry and exit point to neighbouring countries, Chiang Mai is also a doorway to Northern Thailand’s lesser-know cities, such as Chiang Rai, Mae Hong Son and Nakhorn Sawan. Visit Chiang Mailast_img read more

It will be another good barometer for us he sai

first_img“It will be another good barometer for us,” he said. Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires Top Stories Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and selling 0 Comments   Share   But it’s better to have to deal with prosperity than a disappointing season, and right now the Cardinals appear to be peaking, though Arians doesn’t believe that to be the case.“I think we’re getting better each week,” Arians said. “I think our best football is still out there; we left way too many points on the field this weekend. “December football is what it’s all about. You want games to matter in December, and that’s what people remember.”As the calendar turns, though, the Cardinals are in good position to be remembered. Up next is a road game at Philadelphia, another team that is in the playoff race but needs to finish strong. It’s a big game for both teams, and offers another chance for the Cardinals to prove that they are a legitimate playoff contender.During their winning streak, they’ve beaten good teams and won on the road, but have yet to beat a good team on the road. Arians, who is confident in his team’s postseason chances because of “the way it feels right now,” knows a win over the Eagles would go a long way toward improving the team’s reputation as well as its postseason chances. center_img The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelo TEMPE, Ariz. — Bruce Arians was understandably pleased with how his team played in Sunday’s 40-11 rout of the Indianapolis Colts.“Basically, after watching the film, it was a doggone good outing by everybody, especially defensively,” the coach said Monday. Arians added that the offense should have scored more than it did and noted that the blocked field goal in the first quarter wasn’t good, but overall he had little to complain about. The offense piled up 410 yards behind quarterback Carson Palmer’s fourth-straight good game, and the defense limited the Colts to just 4.3 yards per play. It was a team effort; with the blocked field goal being the only real blemish on what otherwise was a good-looking win. Following arguably his team’s most complete game of the season, Arians said this year’s Cardinals remind him a bit of the Colts team he coached last season as well as some of the Steelers teams he was part of, as far as the camaraderie and willingness to sacrifice for the betterment of the team. And that team, with a 7-4 record and four straight wins, has to be feeling pretty good about itself. One of the challenges they’ll face down the stretch, besides opposing teams, is their own success, because with success comes recognition, and with recognition can come a sense of complacency. Dealing with prosperity is something the Cardinals have not had much experience with, and Arians knows it is a challenge his team faces. “The noise level will get higher, pats on the back and all that stuff,” he said. “You start reading the press clippings and feeling the pats on your back and you open yourself up for disaster.” Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impactlast_img read more