Here is Where SingleFamily Homes Sell the Fastest

first_img Days on the Market Homebuilding Housing Inventory National Association of Realtors 2016-08-12 Seth Welborn Share August 12, 2016 568 Views Here is Where Single-Family Homes Sell the Fastestcenter_img While the average number of days on the market for a single-family home ticked up from May to June nationwide, according to the most recent existing-home sales report from the National Association of Realtors (NAR), the number of days that a home remains for sale is shrinking in about a third of the states.About half of the properties that sold in the second quarter were on the market for 30 days or less in 16 states plus the District of Columbia, according to NAR Research Economist Scholastica (Gay) Cororaton.The majority of the states where half the properties sold in less than a month were located in the West and Midwest. The only three of these states located in the East (besides D.C.) were Massachusetts, Virginia, and Georgia.Western states included in the group were California, Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Nevada, Utah, and Colorado. Midwestern states where half of single-family houses sold in less than 30 days were Nebraska, Iowa, and Minnesota. Texas was also included in this group.As to the question of why homes are selling faster in West and Midwest states, the answer lies in the number of new homes that are being built—or rather, aren’t being built.“It all comes down to housing starts,” said Adam DeSanctis of NAR. “In the Midwest, there’s hardly any homes being built. It’s more affordable and you have more buyers there than you had a few years ago. In the West, this has been an issue for quite a few years now since the recovery. The economy, for the most part in most of those local markets is very strong. They just aren’t building enough homes and not enough people are listing their homes for sale. So what you’re seeing is that inventory is tight and homes continue to sell quicker because not enough is being built or put back on the market for existing homeowners to get that supply back up there again.”Distressed properties, which typically stay on the market longer than non-distressed properties, brought up the average number of days on the market. Foreclosed properties stayed on the market for an average of 49 days in June, and short sales took an average of 156 days on the market to sell. As a result, the average number of days on the market rose from 32 to 34 days over-the-month in June while staying flat over-the-year.In some states, single-family houses were still taking a while to sell in Q2. Wyoming, Alabama, and Delaware each had an average of more than 90 days for a single-family home to sell during the second quarter; overall in June, 11 percent of properties nationwide were on the market for longer than six months. in Daily Dose, Data, Headlines, Newslast_img read more

It will be another good barometer for us he sai

first_img“It will be another good barometer for us,” he said. Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires Top Stories Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and selling 0 Comments   Share   But it’s better to have to deal with prosperity than a disappointing season, and right now the Cardinals appear to be peaking, though Arians doesn’t believe that to be the case.“I think we’re getting better each week,” Arians said. “I think our best football is still out there; we left way too many points on the field this weekend. “December football is what it’s all about. You want games to matter in December, and that’s what people remember.”As the calendar turns, though, the Cardinals are in good position to be remembered. Up next is a road game at Philadelphia, another team that is in the playoff race but needs to finish strong. It’s a big game for both teams, and offers another chance for the Cardinals to prove that they are a legitimate playoff contender.During their winning streak, they’ve beaten good teams and won on the road, but have yet to beat a good team on the road. Arians, who is confident in his team’s postseason chances because of “the way it feels right now,” knows a win over the Eagles would go a long way toward improving the team’s reputation as well as its postseason chances. center_img The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelo TEMPE, Ariz. — Bruce Arians was understandably pleased with how his team played in Sunday’s 40-11 rout of the Indianapolis Colts.“Basically, after watching the film, it was a doggone good outing by everybody, especially defensively,” the coach said Monday. Arians added that the offense should have scored more than it did and noted that the blocked field goal in the first quarter wasn’t good, but overall he had little to complain about. The offense piled up 410 yards behind quarterback Carson Palmer’s fourth-straight good game, and the defense limited the Colts to just 4.3 yards per play. It was a team effort; with the blocked field goal being the only real blemish on what otherwise was a good-looking win. Following arguably his team’s most complete game of the season, Arians said this year’s Cardinals remind him a bit of the Colts team he coached last season as well as some of the Steelers teams he was part of, as far as the camaraderie and willingness to sacrifice for the betterment of the team. And that team, with a 7-4 record and four straight wins, has to be feeling pretty good about itself. One of the challenges they’ll face down the stretch, besides opposing teams, is their own success, because with success comes recognition, and with recognition can come a sense of complacency. Dealing with prosperity is something the Cardinals have not had much experience with, and Arians knows it is a challenge his team faces. “The noise level will get higher, pats on the back and all that stuff,” he said. “You start reading the press clippings and feeling the pats on your back and you open yourself up for disaster.” Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impactlast_img read more